Presentation Title

The Effects Green Marketing and Demarketing on Consumer Product Interaction: A Study of Altruistic Consumer Behavior

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Jeffrey Birdsell

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:00 AM

Location

Markstein 301

Session

oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Consumer purchasing intent and outcomes are driven by how organizations and companies communicate products to their targeted audience. Using this information, we conducted a study that examines how the communication of green and demarketing strategies affect consumer purchasing behavior. We gathered data through a survey that contained various questions measuring environmental and personal altruism as well as visual stimuli of t-shirts with different appeals, which was completed by 244 participants. There were four t-shirts total, each including a description of the product, its price, and how it was made. All the products cost the same amount; however, product one contained no appeals, product two used green marketing appeals, product three used a demarketing approach, and product four utilized green and demarketing appeals. We found that as individuals’ personal and environmental altruism increases, prosocial purchase outcomes increases. This study indicates that consumers want to purchase something more than just a product, and they will take the opportunity to contribute to a greater social cause if provided with one.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:00 AM

The Effects Green Marketing and Demarketing on Consumer Product Interaction: A Study of Altruistic Consumer Behavior

Markstein 301

Consumer purchasing intent and outcomes are driven by how organizations and companies communicate products to their targeted audience. Using this information, we conducted a study that examines how the communication of green and demarketing strategies affect consumer purchasing behavior. We gathered data through a survey that contained various questions measuring environmental and personal altruism as well as visual stimuli of t-shirts with different appeals, which was completed by 244 participants. There were four t-shirts total, each including a description of the product, its price, and how it was made. All the products cost the same amount; however, product one contained no appeals, product two used green marketing appeals, product three used a demarketing approach, and product four utilized green and demarketing appeals. We found that as individuals’ personal and environmental altruism increases, prosocial purchase outcomes increases. This study indicates that consumers want to purchase something more than just a product, and they will take the opportunity to contribute to a greater social cause if provided with one.