Presentation Title

The Effects of Acculturation on the Relationship Between Prenatal Maternal Anxiety and Emotion Regulation in Infants

Faculty Mentor

Kimberly D'Anna-Hernandez

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:00 AM

Location

Markstein 306

Session

oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Inadequate emotion regulation is related to socioemotional and behavioral problems, lower academic achievement, and psychopathology later in life. Prenatal maternal anxiety has been predictive of poorer child emotion regulation. Nevertheless, Mexican-American women living in the U.S experience high levels of acculturation, associated with increased risk of prenatal anxiety. However, whether acculturation moderates the association between prenatal maternal anxiety and child emotion regulation is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that acculturation will strengthen the relationship between prenatal maternal anxiety and child emotion regulation as seen through negative vocalizations (i.e. crying or whimpering). We predict that higher levels of prenatal maternal anxiety is related to more negative vocalizations/poorer child emotion regulation in mothers who are more acculturated. This is part of a longitudinal study in which Mexican-American women (n = 99) completed a questionnaire assessing state and trait anxiety during early, mid, and late pregnancy. We measured acculturation levels during early pregnancy using a scale that assesses traditional Mexican cultural values and mainstream Anglo values, reflecting enculturation and acculturation levels respectively. We assessed child emotion regulation via negative vocalizations during the Still-Face paradigm at 6 months postpartum. Our hypothesis was not supported, moderation analyses indicated that more acculturated mothers that exhibited higher levels of prenatal anxiety had children that displayed less negative vocalizations, however only during early pregnancy, b = -.02, SE(b) = .01, t(95) = -2.54, p = .01, 95% CI = [-.03, -.00]. Acculturation did not moderate the relationship between prenatal maternal anxiety and child emotion regulation during mid or late pregnancy, p > .05. These results suggest that acculturation may work as a protective factor for the association between prenatal maternal anxiety and child emotion regulation.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:00 AM

The Effects of Acculturation on the Relationship Between Prenatal Maternal Anxiety and Emotion Regulation in Infants

Markstein 306

Inadequate emotion regulation is related to socioemotional and behavioral problems, lower academic achievement, and psychopathology later in life. Prenatal maternal anxiety has been predictive of poorer child emotion regulation. Nevertheless, Mexican-American women living in the U.S experience high levels of acculturation, associated with increased risk of prenatal anxiety. However, whether acculturation moderates the association between prenatal maternal anxiety and child emotion regulation is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that acculturation will strengthen the relationship between prenatal maternal anxiety and child emotion regulation as seen through negative vocalizations (i.e. crying or whimpering). We predict that higher levels of prenatal maternal anxiety is related to more negative vocalizations/poorer child emotion regulation in mothers who are more acculturated. This is part of a longitudinal study in which Mexican-American women (n = 99) completed a questionnaire assessing state and trait anxiety during early, mid, and late pregnancy. We measured acculturation levels during early pregnancy using a scale that assesses traditional Mexican cultural values and mainstream Anglo values, reflecting enculturation and acculturation levels respectively. We assessed child emotion regulation via negative vocalizations during the Still-Face paradigm at 6 months postpartum. Our hypothesis was not supported, moderation analyses indicated that more acculturated mothers that exhibited higher levels of prenatal anxiety had children that displayed less negative vocalizations, however only during early pregnancy, b = -.02, SE(b) = .01, t(95) = -2.54, p = .01, 95% CI = [-.03, -.00]. Acculturation did not moderate the relationship between prenatal maternal anxiety and child emotion regulation during mid or late pregnancy, p > .05. These results suggest that acculturation may work as a protective factor for the association between prenatal maternal anxiety and child emotion regulation.