Presentation Title

Next Generation In-Vivo and Addressable Biomedical Devices Operated with 3D Magnetic Field Gradient-Based Localization

Faculty Mentor

Azita Emami

Start Date

23-11-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:15 AM

Location

Markstein 308

Session

oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

With low-power, implantable biomedical devices gaining momentum in industry and academia alike, novel approaches to measurement, communication, and integration must be developed in order to enhance the current standard of performance. The method of three-dimensional magnetic field gradient-based localization relies upon coil-induced field gradients that exhibit a bijective mapping with spatial coordinates in order to precisely determine the location of a target device. Through this proposed mechanism of position-broadcasting, in-vivo devices may circumvent the biocompatibility and signal attenuation issues plaguing electromagnetic, acoustic, and imaging-based methods operating at undesired frequencies. A capsule-sized PCB “smart pill”, intended for GI tract monitoring applications, is designed and assembled in order to transmit all measured triple-axis magnetic field data via 2.4 GHz Bluetooth Low Energy communication to an external device. Accompanying the design and development of the smart pill embedded device, a central client system is developed in order to coordinate measurement requests with actuation of the appropriate sequence of electromagnetic coils needed to generate the required monotonic field gradients along all three coordinate axes. Optimized power consumption and RF network matching, multi-agent server connections, non-volatile flash storage, and user-actuated measurements are attained in the final construction of the ingestible capsule device and client system. The localization operation is verified in an in-vitro environment using a series of externally mounted electromagnetic coils, as well as in several liquid solutions emulating the biological conditions of the mammalian GI tract. Ultimately, the success of this field-localized capsule holds profound implications for the future of real-time monitoring of devices in conditions unconducive to standard imaging and communication techniques.

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Nov 23rd, 9:00 AM Nov 23rd, 9:15 AM

Next Generation In-Vivo and Addressable Biomedical Devices Operated with 3D Magnetic Field Gradient-Based Localization

Markstein 308

With low-power, implantable biomedical devices gaining momentum in industry and academia alike, novel approaches to measurement, communication, and integration must be developed in order to enhance the current standard of performance. The method of three-dimensional magnetic field gradient-based localization relies upon coil-induced field gradients that exhibit a bijective mapping with spatial coordinates in order to precisely determine the location of a target device. Through this proposed mechanism of position-broadcasting, in-vivo devices may circumvent the biocompatibility and signal attenuation issues plaguing electromagnetic, acoustic, and imaging-based methods operating at undesired frequencies. A capsule-sized PCB “smart pill”, intended for GI tract monitoring applications, is designed and assembled in order to transmit all measured triple-axis magnetic field data via 2.4 GHz Bluetooth Low Energy communication to an external device. Accompanying the design and development of the smart pill embedded device, a central client system is developed in order to coordinate measurement requests with actuation of the appropriate sequence of electromagnetic coils needed to generate the required monotonic field gradients along all three coordinate axes. Optimized power consumption and RF network matching, multi-agent server connections, non-volatile flash storage, and user-actuated measurements are attained in the final construction of the ingestible capsule device and client system. The localization operation is verified in an in-vitro environment using a series of externally mounted electromagnetic coils, as well as in several liquid solutions emulating the biological conditions of the mammalian GI tract. Ultimately, the success of this field-localized capsule holds profound implications for the future of real-time monitoring of devices in conditions unconducive to standard imaging and communication techniques.