Presentation Title

Faith and Curanderismo: an Accessible and Efficacious Healing Solution for Individuals and Families with No Access to Healthcare in the Border Region of Texas

Faculty Mentor

Veronica Williams, Dennie Johnson, Onesimo Martinez

Start Date

23-11-2019 9:15 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

Markstein 308

Session

oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

Access to healthcare along with its costs have become complicated in recent years and has become especially challenging for individuals that reside along the border region of Texas. The economic and social demographic of the area includes portions of the population that work for less than a living wage with no insurance coverage and a segment of the population that are undocumented immigrants with no access to healthcare. Considering that all at some point will require medical treatment, much of the population in the Texas border regions will have to seek alternate services for treatment. Before the advent of modern medical science and current healthcare insurance systems, humans sought a means to cure sickness. These ancient remedies have been passed down and become an amalgamation of natural healing techniques, religious ideologies, and cultural biases that have become characterized as indigenous healthcare or curanderismo. Interest in curanderismo for this project lies not in its reality, but rather in curanderismo’s sustained social value in practicability and as a pragmatic solution for the spiritual, physical, and mental well-being of a population. Of further concern to this project is the question of curanderismo’s acceptance by a population that is embracing technology more than tradition. The research team at Southwest Texas Junior College has employed both quantitative and qualitative methods for the collection of data that addresses the topic and questions with respect to age, gender, ethnicity, education, and self-reported levels of religiosity. Questionnaires were designed to measure the respondent’s knowledge and experience with curanderismo. The data, interviews with individuals that self-identify as curanderos, and researcher perspectives based on experiential events conclude that curanderismo is a plausible and pragmatic solution for those suffering from acute, chronic, and mental illness for a population that is constrained by the inequity of economics in the Texas border region.

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Nov 23rd, 9:15 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Faith and Curanderismo: an Accessible and Efficacious Healing Solution for Individuals and Families with No Access to Healthcare in the Border Region of Texas

Markstein 308

Access to healthcare along with its costs have become complicated in recent years and has become especially challenging for individuals that reside along the border region of Texas. The economic and social demographic of the area includes portions of the population that work for less than a living wage with no insurance coverage and a segment of the population that are undocumented immigrants with no access to healthcare. Considering that all at some point will require medical treatment, much of the population in the Texas border regions will have to seek alternate services for treatment. Before the advent of modern medical science and current healthcare insurance systems, humans sought a means to cure sickness. These ancient remedies have been passed down and become an amalgamation of natural healing techniques, religious ideologies, and cultural biases that have become characterized as indigenous healthcare or curanderismo. Interest in curanderismo for this project lies not in its reality, but rather in curanderismo’s sustained social value in practicability and as a pragmatic solution for the spiritual, physical, and mental well-being of a population. Of further concern to this project is the question of curanderismo’s acceptance by a population that is embracing technology more than tradition. The research team at Southwest Texas Junior College has employed both quantitative and qualitative methods for the collection of data that addresses the topic and questions with respect to age, gender, ethnicity, education, and self-reported levels of religiosity. Questionnaires were designed to measure the respondent’s knowledge and experience with curanderismo. The data, interviews with individuals that self-identify as curanderos, and researcher perspectives based on experiential events conclude that curanderismo is a plausible and pragmatic solution for those suffering from acute, chronic, and mental illness for a population that is constrained by the inequity of economics in the Texas border region.