Presentation Title

“Educators Working with Undocumented High School Students During the Trump Presidency”

Faculty Mentor

Marisol Clark-Ibanez

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:15 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:30 AM

Location

Markstein 107

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

This study draws upon the experiences of 50 educators working with undocumented high school students in San Diego County, California after the 2016 presidential elections. Since the inauguration of the Trump administration, students and their families have been subjected to heightened levels of immigration enforcement.The literature on undocumented students suggests that educators play a critical role in students’ lives. On the one hand, students often remember the few but impactful educators they have had who genuinely made the difference. On the other hand, educators may derail students’ trajectories if they misinform and discourage them. The scant, yet growing literature on educators who work with undocumented students provides a complex picture on the lack of professional development, the loneliness associated with being the only ally for undocumented students, and the lack of leadership to take bold action on behalf of undocumented students and their families. In-depth interviews and observations with educators reveal that students are very frequently hearing about someone in their community being deported. This has produced a culture of fear, stress, and anxiety in high schools. The three findings are: the navigation of school politics: educators being the only one who undocumented students could trust; and, school politics became more overtly anti-immigrant. Recommendations will be shared.

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Nov 23rd, 10:15 AM Nov 23rd, 10:30 AM

“Educators Working with Undocumented High School Students During the Trump Presidency”

Markstein 107

This study draws upon the experiences of 50 educators working with undocumented high school students in San Diego County, California after the 2016 presidential elections. Since the inauguration of the Trump administration, students and their families have been subjected to heightened levels of immigration enforcement.The literature on undocumented students suggests that educators play a critical role in students’ lives. On the one hand, students often remember the few but impactful educators they have had who genuinely made the difference. On the other hand, educators may derail students’ trajectories if they misinform and discourage them. The scant, yet growing literature on educators who work with undocumented students provides a complex picture on the lack of professional development, the loneliness associated with being the only ally for undocumented students, and the lack of leadership to take bold action on behalf of undocumented students and their families. In-depth interviews and observations with educators reveal that students are very frequently hearing about someone in their community being deported. This has produced a culture of fear, stress, and anxiety in high schools. The three findings are: the navigation of school politics: educators being the only one who undocumented students could trust; and, school politics became more overtly anti-immigrant. Recommendations will be shared.