Presentation Title

Meaning-Making in Organizing Conservative and Non-Conservative Political Events on a College Campus

Faculty Mentor

Edwin Lopez PhD

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:00 AM

Location

Markstein 101

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

This research aims to examine the motivation behind organizing conservative and non-conservative events and the meaning students attribute to their involvement. Moreover, this study explores how students understand and interpret their participation. Data for this study was collected by conducting structured interviews with 9 participants (n = 9). The intended population is college students from a Southern California college campus. 2 of the participants identify or have identified with a conservative campus organization while the other 7 identify with a non-conservative organization countering the conservative organization at the time of a campus political event. Convenience and snowball sampling was used to recruit participants. This methodology follows what sociologist Max Weber (1914) referred to as, “Sociology is a science concerning itself with the interpretive understanding of social action and thereby with a causal explanation of its course and consequences.” An interpretive understanding of the meaning and drive behind the formation of these political events is crucial to developing an explanation for what triggers social action. My study aims to contribute to the following 1) increase our knowledge of the motivations and meanings college students place on organizing events with controversial speakers, as well as protesting them, 2) how students weigh the consequences of their actions, especially as it relates to social relations (stigma or approval), campus climate, safety and property damage, and economic costs (e.g. security, police, taxes). This research was presented with limitations including the smaller sample size (n = 9) and the uneven ratio of non-conservative participants (n = 7) to conservative participants (n = 2). Future approaches could include a focus on obtaining an even sample of non-conservative and conservative participants as well as a comparison of the two. This research is still on-going.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:00 AM

Meaning-Making in Organizing Conservative and Non-Conservative Political Events on a College Campus

Markstein 101

This research aims to examine the motivation behind organizing conservative and non-conservative events and the meaning students attribute to their involvement. Moreover, this study explores how students understand and interpret their participation. Data for this study was collected by conducting structured interviews with 9 participants (n = 9). The intended population is college students from a Southern California college campus. 2 of the participants identify or have identified with a conservative campus organization while the other 7 identify with a non-conservative organization countering the conservative organization at the time of a campus political event. Convenience and snowball sampling was used to recruit participants. This methodology follows what sociologist Max Weber (1914) referred to as, “Sociology is a science concerning itself with the interpretive understanding of social action and thereby with a causal explanation of its course and consequences.” An interpretive understanding of the meaning and drive behind the formation of these political events is crucial to developing an explanation for what triggers social action. My study aims to contribute to the following 1) increase our knowledge of the motivations and meanings college students place on organizing events with controversial speakers, as well as protesting them, 2) how students weigh the consequences of their actions, especially as it relates to social relations (stigma or approval), campus climate, safety and property damage, and economic costs (e.g. security, police, taxes). This research was presented with limitations including the smaller sample size (n = 9) and the uneven ratio of non-conservative participants (n = 7) to conservative participants (n = 2). Future approaches could include a focus on obtaining an even sample of non-conservative and conservative participants as well as a comparison of the two. This research is still on-going.