Presentation Title

Impact of Religiosity on Prosocial Behavior

Presenter Information

Michael ApostolFollow

Faculty Mentor

Rebekah Wanic, PhD

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:00 AM

Location

Markstein 210

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Many religious traditions are grounded in an ethic of care, promoting prosocial behavior and leading to the creation of many hospitals, homeless shelters, and charities (Hardy, 2013). Not surprisingly then, prior research has attempted to explore the relationship between religion and prosocial behavior. Findings on the connection between the two variables have been mixed, with some studies arguing that greater religiosity increases prosocial behavior (Jordan, Leliveld, & Tenbrunsel, 2015; Aveyard, 2014), while others claim that it reduces prosociality (Batson et al., 1989), or that religion has no effect on charitable behavior (Xygalatas et al., 2016). The present studies are designed to address the shortcomings of past research, namely vague measures of religiosity and low ecological validity. Study 1 evaluates the interaction of religiosity, donation behavior, and framing effects with an online survey. Study 2 is a replication of Grossman and Parrett’s (2011) field experiment, assessing the impact of religiosity on restaurant tipping. Both studies utilize a comprehensive measure of religiosity, the Centrality of Religiosity Scale (CRS; Huber and Huber, 2012), which generates a score based on five religiosity sub-domains: public practice, private practice, experience, ideology, and intellect. In Study 1, participants (n = 83) answered CRS questions and were asked about donating (likelihood and amount) to a religious or non-religious environmental organization, framed to emphasize gain or loss. In Study 2 (n = 47), diners leaving restaurants were asked to complete a questionnaire with CRS items and information about their recent restaurant experience and tipping habits. A positive correlation between CRS scores and donations (Study 1) or tipping (Study 2) was expected (Galen, 2012; Regnerus, Smith, & Sikkink, 1998) along with increased donations for the religious and loss-framed scenarios (Study 1). Contrary to expectations, religiosity was unrelated to prosocial behavior across both studies, however, a loss-framed message led to increased willingness to donate.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:00 AM

Impact of Religiosity on Prosocial Behavior

Markstein 210

Many religious traditions are grounded in an ethic of care, promoting prosocial behavior and leading to the creation of many hospitals, homeless shelters, and charities (Hardy, 2013). Not surprisingly then, prior research has attempted to explore the relationship between religion and prosocial behavior. Findings on the connection between the two variables have been mixed, with some studies arguing that greater religiosity increases prosocial behavior (Jordan, Leliveld, & Tenbrunsel, 2015; Aveyard, 2014), while others claim that it reduces prosociality (Batson et al., 1989), or that religion has no effect on charitable behavior (Xygalatas et al., 2016). The present studies are designed to address the shortcomings of past research, namely vague measures of religiosity and low ecological validity. Study 1 evaluates the interaction of religiosity, donation behavior, and framing effects with an online survey. Study 2 is a replication of Grossman and Parrett’s (2011) field experiment, assessing the impact of religiosity on restaurant tipping. Both studies utilize a comprehensive measure of religiosity, the Centrality of Religiosity Scale (CRS; Huber and Huber, 2012), which generates a score based on five religiosity sub-domains: public practice, private practice, experience, ideology, and intellect. In Study 1, participants (n = 83) answered CRS questions and were asked about donating (likelihood and amount) to a religious or non-religious environmental organization, framed to emphasize gain or loss. In Study 2 (n = 47), diners leaving restaurants were asked to complete a questionnaire with CRS items and information about their recent restaurant experience and tipping habits. A positive correlation between CRS scores and donations (Study 1) or tipping (Study 2) was expected (Galen, 2012; Regnerus, Smith, & Sikkink, 1998) along with increased donations for the religious and loss-framed scenarios (Study 1). Contrary to expectations, religiosity was unrelated to prosocial behavior across both studies, however, a loss-framed message led to increased willingness to donate.