Presentation Title

Ni Aquí Ni Allá: Pero por Todos Partes

Presenter Information

Shysel GranadosFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Joan Wines

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:00 AM

Location

Markstein 211

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

Daisy Hernández has emerged as a particularly effective writer in the growing group of those who are grappling with issues involving marginalized individuals and communities in the U.S. today. To read about her life is to discover one reason why. To read her essays, articles, memoir, and fiction is to discover another reason. Reason number one: Hernández, a second-generation American citizen who is half-Cuban, half-Columbian, and bisexual, seems to instinctively infuse the legitimacy of her multipart identity into her work. Her diverse background provides on-the- ground globally-relevant facts for her material on the country’s marginalized minorities-- including immigrants from other countries and the LGBTQ+ community. She mixes the perspectives of her multicultural position with the understanding of what it means to be raised in an immigrant family in the United States so that her active awareness of other countries’ cultures and crises is convincingly contextualized by her experience as a U.S. citizen. The second reason her work is being so well received is that she is a first-class prose-writing journalist who uses storytelling techniques. Her readers relate to the people and circumstances in these stories, which evoke remarkable emotional responses. Hernández’s poetic prose and her concentration on the personal give her journalism an edge over those whose work is more rhetorical and/or lack the knowledge and conviction that comes from up-close experience. In response to Hernández’s personal journalistic style, her audiences are likely to feel before they think. My research and examples of Hernández’s texts show that her style and inclusive scope offer readers a more meaningful experience than is the case with the work of journalists who less accurately and less fully describe the complexities of their subjects.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:00 AM

Ni Aquí Ni Allá: Pero por Todos Partes

Markstein 211

Daisy Hernández has emerged as a particularly effective writer in the growing group of those who are grappling with issues involving marginalized individuals and communities in the U.S. today. To read about her life is to discover one reason why. To read her essays, articles, memoir, and fiction is to discover another reason. Reason number one: Hernández, a second-generation American citizen who is half-Cuban, half-Columbian, and bisexual, seems to instinctively infuse the legitimacy of her multipart identity into her work. Her diverse background provides on-the- ground globally-relevant facts for her material on the country’s marginalized minorities-- including immigrants from other countries and the LGBTQ+ community. She mixes the perspectives of her multicultural position with the understanding of what it means to be raised in an immigrant family in the United States so that her active awareness of other countries’ cultures and crises is convincingly contextualized by her experience as a U.S. citizen. The second reason her work is being so well received is that she is a first-class prose-writing journalist who uses storytelling techniques. Her readers relate to the people and circumstances in these stories, which evoke remarkable emotional responses. Hernández’s poetic prose and her concentration on the personal give her journalism an edge over those whose work is more rhetorical and/or lack the knowledge and conviction that comes from up-close experience. In response to Hernández’s personal journalistic style, her audiences are likely to feel before they think. My research and examples of Hernández’s texts show that her style and inclusive scope offer readers a more meaningful experience than is the case with the work of journalists who less accurately and less fully describe the complexities of their subjects.