Presentation Title

Multilingualism, Intercultural Competence, and Intercultural Sensitivity: A Quantitative Study

Faculty Mentor

Tara Suwinyattichaiporn

Start Date

23-11-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:15 AM

Location

Markstein 213

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

In an increasingly globalized world, this study explores the effects of monolingualism and multilingualism on intercultural competence and intercultural sensitivity. The current literature on intercultural competence, intercultural sensitivity, and multilingualism is somewhat limited in terms of connectivity between those specific subjects. This study bridged the gap in research between the aforementioned intercultural skills and their effects on one another. Having high levels of intercultural competence and/or intercultural sensitivity entails that one has the skills to engage with individuals of other cultures. Previous research suggests that multilingual individuals will possess more intercultural sensitivity as well as intercultural competence than monolingual individuals, but what is more telling is that multilingualism, intercultural competence, and intercultural sensitivity are involved in a positive feedback loop that ultimately strengthen each other. We conducted a quantitative research utilizing survey questionnaire. The sample consists of 133 college students (N = 133) of various races: 46.67% were Caucasians (n = 63), 3.7% were African Americans (n = 5), 23.7% were Hispanics (n = 32), 7.41% were Asians (n = 10), 2.96% were Hawaiian (n = 4), 1.48% were Middle Eastern (n = 2), 11.11% were mixed race (n =15), and 2.96% people did not identify with any of these categories (n = 4). 60% of the participants were monolingual (n = 81), while only 40% of them were multilingual (n = 54). Interestingly, our study found non-significant results, which means the difference between multilingual college students and monolingual college students in regards to their levels of intercultural sensitivity and intercultural competence is not conclusive.

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Nov 23rd, 11:00 AM Nov 23rd, 11:15 AM

Multilingualism, Intercultural Competence, and Intercultural Sensitivity: A Quantitative Study

Markstein 213

In an increasingly globalized world, this study explores the effects of monolingualism and multilingualism on intercultural competence and intercultural sensitivity. The current literature on intercultural competence, intercultural sensitivity, and multilingualism is somewhat limited in terms of connectivity between those specific subjects. This study bridged the gap in research between the aforementioned intercultural skills and their effects on one another. Having high levels of intercultural competence and/or intercultural sensitivity entails that one has the skills to engage with individuals of other cultures. Previous research suggests that multilingual individuals will possess more intercultural sensitivity as well as intercultural competence than monolingual individuals, but what is more telling is that multilingualism, intercultural competence, and intercultural sensitivity are involved in a positive feedback loop that ultimately strengthen each other. We conducted a quantitative research utilizing survey questionnaire. The sample consists of 133 college students (N = 133) of various races: 46.67% were Caucasians (n = 63), 3.7% were African Americans (n = 5), 23.7% were Hispanics (n = 32), 7.41% were Asians (n = 10), 2.96% were Hawaiian (n = 4), 1.48% were Middle Eastern (n = 2), 11.11% were mixed race (n =15), and 2.96% people did not identify with any of these categories (n = 4). 60% of the participants were monolingual (n = 81), while only 40% of them were multilingual (n = 54). Interestingly, our study found non-significant results, which means the difference between multilingual college students and monolingual college students in regards to their levels of intercultural sensitivity and intercultural competence is not conclusive.