Presentation Title

Remembering the Salvadoran Civil War as a Child Soldier

Presenter Information

Kevin RamirezFollow

Faculty Mentor

Alicia Ivonne Estrada

Start Date

23-11-2019 11:15 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

Markstein 213

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

From 1980 to 1992, El Salvador experienced a vicious civil war that killed approximately 75,000 people and displaced roughly 1 million Salvadorans. One of the Salvadoran military’s tactics included the forced recruitment of children from poor and rural areas. This vastly impacted the lives of boys under the age of eighteen who immigrated to the United States between 1980 to 1992. Moreover, despite the voluntary recruitment age being sixteen, the Child Soldiers Report of 2001 reported that an estimated 80% of the Salvadoran troops were under the age of eighteen. The recruitment by the military abetted in shaping a harrowing experience for young men who grew up under a vicious military government. Once recruited they were trained and forced to fight for the Salvadoran government to kill their compatriots. In some cases, they were obligated to kill people from their communities. This played a major role in deciding whether they wanted to continue to serve in the Salvadoran military or flee the country. Under these violent conditions, the boys had to leave their families often unaccompanied, without money or a plan, but a goal to flee El Salvador and find refuge in the United States.

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Nov 23rd, 11:15 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Remembering the Salvadoran Civil War as a Child Soldier

Markstein 213

From 1980 to 1992, El Salvador experienced a vicious civil war that killed approximately 75,000 people and displaced roughly 1 million Salvadorans. One of the Salvadoran military’s tactics included the forced recruitment of children from poor and rural areas. This vastly impacted the lives of boys under the age of eighteen who immigrated to the United States between 1980 to 1992. Moreover, despite the voluntary recruitment age being sixteen, the Child Soldiers Report of 2001 reported that an estimated 80% of the Salvadoran troops were under the age of eighteen. The recruitment by the military abetted in shaping a harrowing experience for young men who grew up under a vicious military government. Once recruited they were trained and forced to fight for the Salvadoran government to kill their compatriots. In some cases, they were obligated to kill people from their communities. This played a major role in deciding whether they wanted to continue to serve in the Salvadoran military or flee the country. Under these violent conditions, the boys had to leave their families often unaccompanied, without money or a plan, but a goal to flee El Salvador and find refuge in the United States.