Presentation Title

Relational Complexities between News Media and Their Consumers

Presenter Information

Antonio PequenoFollow

Faculty Mentor

Brian Dolber

Start Date

23-11-2019 11:15 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

Markstein 301

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Journalism is a channel of insight and information for its many readers and as a result, is crucial for how they perceive their collective reality. Within this relationship, trust is a matter of utmost importance. Unfortunately, consumers of varying political ideologies have a tendency to dismiss particular news outlets at the mere sight of certain publication names. This reality provokes a question: How might different reporting and writing styles alone impact consumers’ levels of trust? To better understand this question and gain insight on how consumers come to form their perceptions of trust, this research gathered three participants for two interviews and a supplementary experiment for each participant. The pre-experiment interview established each participants’ political ideology, perspective on news media and news consumption tendencies, among other things. The experiment had each participant read four different articles (each with different political leanings) that reported on the same story. The kicker: Each article was devoid of its publication’s name, so participants could only base their levels of trust on the reporting and writing featured in each article. A post-experiment interview asked participants to rank the four articles from most trustworthy to least trustworthy and additionally asked what factors played into those very rankings. Results showed that the participants’ rankings were not always in line with their ideological or news outlet preferences that were established in the pre-experiment interview. Moreover, participants identified components such as typography, amount of information and use of “biased” wording that impacted their levels of trust with each article. The conclusions made within this research enforce the idea that for responsible news consumption, consumers must be open to critically engaging with varying news outlets, while also amending the idea that any level of bias is a justifiable reason to dismiss entire groups of news outlets.

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Nov 23rd, 11:15 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Relational Complexities between News Media and Their Consumers

Markstein 301

Journalism is a channel of insight and information for its many readers and as a result, is crucial for how they perceive their collective reality. Within this relationship, trust is a matter of utmost importance. Unfortunately, consumers of varying political ideologies have a tendency to dismiss particular news outlets at the mere sight of certain publication names. This reality provokes a question: How might different reporting and writing styles alone impact consumers’ levels of trust? To better understand this question and gain insight on how consumers come to form their perceptions of trust, this research gathered three participants for two interviews and a supplementary experiment for each participant. The pre-experiment interview established each participants’ political ideology, perspective on news media and news consumption tendencies, among other things. The experiment had each participant read four different articles (each with different political leanings) that reported on the same story. The kicker: Each article was devoid of its publication’s name, so participants could only base their levels of trust on the reporting and writing featured in each article. A post-experiment interview asked participants to rank the four articles from most trustworthy to least trustworthy and additionally asked what factors played into those very rankings. Results showed that the participants’ rankings were not always in line with their ideological or news outlet preferences that were established in the pre-experiment interview. Moreover, participants identified components such as typography, amount of information and use of “biased” wording that impacted their levels of trust with each article. The conclusions made within this research enforce the idea that for responsible news consumption, consumers must be open to critically engaging with varying news outlets, while also amending the idea that any level of bias is a justifiable reason to dismiss entire groups of news outlets.