Presentation Title

The Effect of Manganese on E.coli Mutation Rates

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Paul Lee

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:15 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:30 AM

Location

Markstein 102

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The mntH gene codes for the manganese import protein which is critical to the uptake of manganese when E. coli is under oxidative stress. The ability of a cell to uptake manganese is an important mechanism used to protect the cell, as manganese is a redox cofactor known to prevent oxidative damage of proteins and DNA. The mntH gene was knocked out in E. coli strains CSH101 and CSH104, and the mutation rates were assessed though the lacZ reversion assay. This test is able to assess the mutation rates due to a single base substitution in the lacZ gene which leads to a difference in one amino acid, producing proteins which are unable to metabolize lactose. This allows for the determination of mutation rates by observing the number of lac(-) to lac(+) revertants. Overall, the CSH101 and CSH104 knockout strains were observed to mutate more often than the wildtype strains, as more revertants were observed in the knockout strains. This suggests that mntH aids in the prevention of mutations, as reporter strains whose point mutation is sensitive to oxidative damage and lack mntH are seen to mutate more often than those that do have the gene

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Nov 23rd, 10:15 AM Nov 23rd, 10:30 AM

The Effect of Manganese on E.coli Mutation Rates

Markstein 102

The mntH gene codes for the manganese import protein which is critical to the uptake of manganese when E. coli is under oxidative stress. The ability of a cell to uptake manganese is an important mechanism used to protect the cell, as manganese is a redox cofactor known to prevent oxidative damage of proteins and DNA. The mntH gene was knocked out in E. coli strains CSH101 and CSH104, and the mutation rates were assessed though the lacZ reversion assay. This test is able to assess the mutation rates due to a single base substitution in the lacZ gene which leads to a difference in one amino acid, producing proteins which are unable to metabolize lactose. This allows for the determination of mutation rates by observing the number of lac(-) to lac(+) revertants. Overall, the CSH101 and CSH104 knockout strains were observed to mutate more often than the wildtype strains, as more revertants were observed in the knockout strains. This suggests that mntH aids in the prevention of mutations, as reporter strains whose point mutation is sensitive to oxidative damage and lack mntH are seen to mutate more often than those that do have the gene