Presentation Title

The Influence Of Stereotype Threat On Performance And Emotion Regulation Among Racial-ethnic Minorities In Competitive Gaming

Faculty Mentor

Mark Beeman, Kyle Nolla

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:30 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

Markstein 303

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Historically, video games have been a predominantly young, straight, White male’s domain and those with other identities may experience exclusion (e.g. harassment, microaggressions, etc.) within gaming communities. While gender imbalance in gaming has been the subject of much research, fewer studies examine the racial and ethnic minority (REM) experience within gaming communities. One relevant phenomenon that could impact minority experience is stereotype threat, where individuals who experience exclusion within an environment have anxiety about racial stereotyping that leads to worse performance in cognitive tasks. This work surveys competitive Super Smash Bros players to explore how ST influences gaming performance and invokes negative affects in REMs within the community. We compared groups of REM and White players on gaming ability and emotion regulation, two factors that reflect experiences of stereotyping. Survey data was collected by a researcher stationed at a booth at national Smash Bros tournaments over the course of 4 years (N = 235). Participants completed questionnaires assessing game experiences, their identity as gamers, and their objective tournament performance. Interestingly, REM individuals (specifically Black and Hispanic players) rate themselves higher on in-game emotion regulation (p = 0.018) and Asian players rate themselves greater in competitiveness (p = 0.035). REM also trend to better tournament outcomes compared to white players (p=.053). REM players might be self-selecting out of the community: those who have sufficient emotion regulation skills to deal with stereotyping remain, while those who cannot deal with stereotyping leave. Additionally, REMs might be more motivated by competition than social bonding because they are excluded – that is, white players experience social acceptance which motivates them to stay in the community even if they do not perform well. Understanding the operation of stereotype threat among REMs in gaming communities will grant us insight into REMs’ experiences and advance similarly imbalanced technological/scientific fields.

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Nov 23rd, 10:30 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

The Influence Of Stereotype Threat On Performance And Emotion Regulation Among Racial-ethnic Minorities In Competitive Gaming

Markstein 303

Historically, video games have been a predominantly young, straight, White male’s domain and those with other identities may experience exclusion (e.g. harassment, microaggressions, etc.) within gaming communities. While gender imbalance in gaming has been the subject of much research, fewer studies examine the racial and ethnic minority (REM) experience within gaming communities. One relevant phenomenon that could impact minority experience is stereotype threat, where individuals who experience exclusion within an environment have anxiety about racial stereotyping that leads to worse performance in cognitive tasks. This work surveys competitive Super Smash Bros players to explore how ST influences gaming performance and invokes negative affects in REMs within the community. We compared groups of REM and White players on gaming ability and emotion regulation, two factors that reflect experiences of stereotyping. Survey data was collected by a researcher stationed at a booth at national Smash Bros tournaments over the course of 4 years (N = 235). Participants completed questionnaires assessing game experiences, their identity as gamers, and their objective tournament performance. Interestingly, REM individuals (specifically Black and Hispanic players) rate themselves higher on in-game emotion regulation (p = 0.018) and Asian players rate themselves greater in competitiveness (p = 0.035). REM also trend to better tournament outcomes compared to white players (p=.053). REM players might be self-selecting out of the community: those who have sufficient emotion regulation skills to deal with stereotyping remain, while those who cannot deal with stereotyping leave. Additionally, REMs might be more motivated by competition than social bonding because they are excluded – that is, white players experience social acceptance which motivates them to stay in the community even if they do not perform well. Understanding the operation of stereotype threat among REMs in gaming communities will grant us insight into REMs’ experiences and advance similarly imbalanced technological/scientific fields.