Presentation Title

Multiple Regression Analysis of Predictive Factors Leading to Increased Overdose Rates in America

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Rebecca Nash

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:00 AM

Location

Markstein 303

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

More than 130 people die each day from opioid overdoses in the US (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2018). From 2006-2016 opioid overdoses in the US increased 85% and currently makeup 66% of all overdoses. During those ten years, all but four states had a percent change increase in overdose rates despite the drastic reduction in prescription opioids dispensed. With the amount of dispensed prescription opioids in decline, it is important to identify additional predictive factors of this substantial increase in overdose-related deaths. The goal of this analysis is to determine the relationship between five predictor variables and the outcome of drug overdoses. A standard multiple regression was performed to assess the opiate prescriptions, incarceration, homelessness, unemployment, and mental illness in predicting overdose-related deaths in the US by state. It was hypothesized that prescribing rates and incarceration would play a significant role, while unemployment and homelessness would have little bearing on the dependent variable. Preliminary findings show that opioid prescriptions, incarceration and mental illness are significant predictors of opioid deaths

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:00 AM

Multiple Regression Analysis of Predictive Factors Leading to Increased Overdose Rates in America

Markstein 303

More than 130 people die each day from opioid overdoses in the US (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2018). From 2006-2016 opioid overdoses in the US increased 85% and currently makeup 66% of all overdoses. During those ten years, all but four states had a percent change increase in overdose rates despite the drastic reduction in prescription opioids dispensed. With the amount of dispensed prescription opioids in decline, it is important to identify additional predictive factors of this substantial increase in overdose-related deaths. The goal of this analysis is to determine the relationship between five predictor variables and the outcome of drug overdoses. A standard multiple regression was performed to assess the opiate prescriptions, incarceration, homelessness, unemployment, and mental illness in predicting overdose-related deaths in the US by state. It was hypothesized that prescribing rates and incarceration would play a significant role, while unemployment and homelessness would have little bearing on the dependent variable. Preliminary findings show that opioid prescriptions, incarceration and mental illness are significant predictors of opioid deaths