Presentation Title

The relationship between gratitude and academic satisfaction in college students

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Misty Kolchakian

Start Date

23-11-2019 11:15 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

Markstein 303

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

In recent years, positive psychology has experienced considerable growth as a discipline, especially in the study of gratitude. Although gratitude has been linked to a number of traits, such as prosociality, physical wellness, optimism, life satisfaction, and happiness, there is minimal research examining the role of gratitude in higher education. The purpose of the current study is to explore the relationship between college students’ gratitude and their degree of college satisfaction. The authors aim to test their hypothesis that there will be a positive correlation between gratitude and college satisfaction. The authors also seek to answer two research questions. First, do certain demographic variables, such as race, age, or socioeconomic status, have an effect on the degree of gratitude that college students exhibit? Second, will college students have a higher endorsement of items related to thoughts and feelings of gratitude, as compared to actions of gratitude? This study analyzes data gathered from 25-item surveys completed by 57 (26 male, 31 female) students at a community college in California. The data supported the authors’ hypothesis and showed a statistically significant correlation between gratitude and college satisfaction (r = .436, p < 0.005). The data did not indicate that race, age, or socioeconomic status had an effect on degree of gratitude. The data did show that college students’ endorsement of gratitude-related thoughts and feelings was higher than it was for gratitude-related actions. To the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to examine the relationship between gratitude and academic satisfaction in college students. These findings have practical implications for educators, administrators, and students, particularly in terms of increasing academic satisfaction, retention, and success.

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Nov 23rd, 11:15 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

The relationship between gratitude and academic satisfaction in college students

Markstein 303

In recent years, positive psychology has experienced considerable growth as a discipline, especially in the study of gratitude. Although gratitude has been linked to a number of traits, such as prosociality, physical wellness, optimism, life satisfaction, and happiness, there is minimal research examining the role of gratitude in higher education. The purpose of the current study is to explore the relationship between college students’ gratitude and their degree of college satisfaction. The authors aim to test their hypothesis that there will be a positive correlation between gratitude and college satisfaction. The authors also seek to answer two research questions. First, do certain demographic variables, such as race, age, or socioeconomic status, have an effect on the degree of gratitude that college students exhibit? Second, will college students have a higher endorsement of items related to thoughts and feelings of gratitude, as compared to actions of gratitude? This study analyzes data gathered from 25-item surveys completed by 57 (26 male, 31 female) students at a community college in California. The data supported the authors’ hypothesis and showed a statistically significant correlation between gratitude and college satisfaction (r = .436, p < 0.005). The data did not indicate that race, age, or socioeconomic status had an effect on degree of gratitude. The data did show that college students’ endorsement of gratitude-related thoughts and feelings was higher than it was for gratitude-related actions. To the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to examine the relationship between gratitude and academic satisfaction in college students. These findings have practical implications for educators, administrators, and students, particularly in terms of increasing academic satisfaction, retention, and success.