Presentation Title

Fear of Public Charge

Presenter Information

Kristine HolmesFollow

Faculty Mentor

Konane Martinez

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:15 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:30 AM

Location

Markstein 306

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Political rhetoric and proposed changes to policy related to immigrant access to healthcare and public programs is causing confusion and fear across the United States. Misinformation about public services and access to healthcare is prevalent and growing in immigrant communities. Healthcare providers struggle to provide correct information to combat these fears while at the same time encouraging access to services. This research projects aims to understand the challenges front line staff face in the current policy and anti-immigrant environment. Data collection was done through interviews and focus groups in two federally qualified health care centers in Southern California. Analysis of the data uncovers themes related to how clinic staff perceive the immigrant community’s knowledge related to their access to health and social service programs as well as their fear of being labeled a “public charge.” The research results are discussed in light of current policy and political debate related to providing healthcare to immigrants and highlight the impact these debates have upon both healthcare providers and immigrant families. The presentation concludes with a set of policy recommendations aimed to help providers and policy makers address access issues in the current anti-immigrant climate.

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Nov 23rd, 10:15 AM Nov 23rd, 10:30 AM

Fear of Public Charge

Markstein 306

Political rhetoric and proposed changes to policy related to immigrant access to healthcare and public programs is causing confusion and fear across the United States. Misinformation about public services and access to healthcare is prevalent and growing in immigrant communities. Healthcare providers struggle to provide correct information to combat these fears while at the same time encouraging access to services. This research projects aims to understand the challenges front line staff face in the current policy and anti-immigrant environment. Data collection was done through interviews and focus groups in two federally qualified health care centers in Southern California. Analysis of the data uncovers themes related to how clinic staff perceive the immigrant community’s knowledge related to their access to health and social service programs as well as their fear of being labeled a “public charge.” The research results are discussed in light of current policy and political debate related to providing healthcare to immigrants and highlight the impact these debates have upon both healthcare providers and immigrant families. The presentation concludes with a set of policy recommendations aimed to help providers and policy makers address access issues in the current anti-immigrant climate.