Presentation Title

Techno Music and Time in France

Faculty Mentor

Denis Cerclet

Start Date

23-11-2019 11:15 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

Markstein 306

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The purpose of the research was to determine how the experience of people within the techno music subculture relates to the broader social ecology. Using participant observation and interviews over a period of four months, the researcher was able to demonstrate that the taxonomic divisions of time (weeks, days, hours, minutes, and seconds) play a crucial role in the construction of the techno music scene in France. Techno events were found to take place during the inverse of what were considered normative, productive work hours. The research showed that the participants in this domain were motivated in part by labor conditions and the lack of freedom afforded by the rigid workweek. Once within these temporally segregated spaces, the repetitive, mechanically produced rhythms engendered sensations of subjective temporal expansion and contraction. Many participants furthermore expressed feelings of heightened emotion and increased affection for others, which they associated with “losing track of time” and dancing for hours. These feelings were enhanced by the favorable temporal conditions fostered within the subculture. Thus the research was able to show the techno subculture maintains a dialectical relationship to the broader social domain by manipulating temporal experience.

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Nov 23rd, 11:15 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Techno Music and Time in France

Markstein 306

The purpose of the research was to determine how the experience of people within the techno music subculture relates to the broader social ecology. Using participant observation and interviews over a period of four months, the researcher was able to demonstrate that the taxonomic divisions of time (weeks, days, hours, minutes, and seconds) play a crucial role in the construction of the techno music scene in France. Techno events were found to take place during the inverse of what were considered normative, productive work hours. The research showed that the participants in this domain were motivated in part by labor conditions and the lack of freedom afforded by the rigid workweek. Once within these temporally segregated spaces, the repetitive, mechanically produced rhythms engendered sensations of subjective temporal expansion and contraction. Many participants furthermore expressed feelings of heightened emotion and increased affection for others, which they associated with “losing track of time” and dancing for hours. These feelings were enhanced by the favorable temporal conditions fostered within the subculture. Thus the research was able to show the techno subculture maintains a dialectical relationship to the broader social domain by manipulating temporal experience.