Presentation Title

Does Road Dust Have an Effect on Nectar Production in Ipomopsis Aggregata?

Faculty Mentor

Nick Waser, Mary Price

Start Date

23-11-2019 12:30 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 12:45 PM

Location

Markstein 103

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Road dust has potential impacts on plant metabolism and reproduction even in small amounts. Dust is everywhere and is increasing due to human influence, which has the potential to reduce overall plant pollination worldwide. Since dust is roughly the size of a grain of pollen, it is possible for dust to clog the stigma of plants. Previous work has shown a correlation between road dust and flower life span as well as pollination success (Mary Price personal communication 2019; Waser et al. 2017). For these reasons we are determining whether road dust affects nectar production in Ipomopsis aggregata.

In order to explore this question, we located 30 pairs of flowering I. aggregata plants. We simulated roadside dust levels with 5 puffs of sieved dust from a garden duster to one half of the plants, while the other half received a controlled 5 puffs of normal air from another garden duster. Treatment was assigned at random within each pair. Elongated flower buds on these plants were capped with a piece of drinking straw for 21-29 hours to prevent pollinators from removing nectar. Then the nectar was collected utilizing a 10-microliter microcapillary tube, and the concentration of the nectar was measured using a refractometer. To determine the mass of sugar in each sample we converted from percent mass to volume. The corolla length of each flower was measured as a covariant to determine if dust affects flower size. It was found that road dust had no effect on nectar production; however, there seems to be a yearly affect that influences the response to the dusting treatment. There was also found to be a correlation where corolla length and nectar volume increase, sugar mass decreases. Further studies utilizing the same experimental procedure over a longer period to test results and strengthen working theories.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 12:30 PM Nov 23rd, 12:45 PM

Does Road Dust Have an Effect on Nectar Production in Ipomopsis Aggregata?

Markstein 103

Road dust has potential impacts on plant metabolism and reproduction even in small amounts. Dust is everywhere and is increasing due to human influence, which has the potential to reduce overall plant pollination worldwide. Since dust is roughly the size of a grain of pollen, it is possible for dust to clog the stigma of plants. Previous work has shown a correlation between road dust and flower life span as well as pollination success (Mary Price personal communication 2019; Waser et al. 2017). For these reasons we are determining whether road dust affects nectar production in Ipomopsis aggregata.

In order to explore this question, we located 30 pairs of flowering I. aggregata plants. We simulated roadside dust levels with 5 puffs of sieved dust from a garden duster to one half of the plants, while the other half received a controlled 5 puffs of normal air from another garden duster. Treatment was assigned at random within each pair. Elongated flower buds on these plants were capped with a piece of drinking straw for 21-29 hours to prevent pollinators from removing nectar. Then the nectar was collected utilizing a 10-microliter microcapillary tube, and the concentration of the nectar was measured using a refractometer. To determine the mass of sugar in each sample we converted from percent mass to volume. The corolla length of each flower was measured as a covariant to determine if dust affects flower size. It was found that road dust had no effect on nectar production; however, there seems to be a yearly affect that influences the response to the dusting treatment. There was also found to be a correlation where corolla length and nectar volume increase, sugar mass decreases. Further studies utilizing the same experimental procedure over a longer period to test results and strengthen working theories.