Presentation Title

The Dynamics of Intelligence and Creativity and their Relationship to Humor Styles and Tendencies

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Weldon Smith

Start Date

23-11-2019 12:30 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 12:45 PM

Location

Markstein 203

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Intelligence and creativity have been found to strongly correlate to an individual’s tendency to seek out humor. Additionally, different humor styles have been identified: two associated with negative mental health (aggressive and self-defeating humor) and two associated with positive mental health (affiliative and self-enhancing). The current study aimed to not only use intelligence and creativity as predictors for how necessary humor is in an individual’s life but also investigate how both traits relate to specific humor styles to answer the following research questions: 1. Do creativity and intelligence predict an individual’s need for humor? 2. Do creativity and intelligence predict specific humor styles? To investigate these research questions, three surveys will be administered to participants to determine their creativity, need for humor, and humor styles. Afterwards, an intelligence test will be administered. Path analyses will be used to analyze the full data once data collection has been completed. Results from the current study can help us better understand humor. Results may also suggest that class clowns might be more intelligent than others think, but also susceptible to negative mental health outcomes. At the same time, establishing this relationship between specific humor styles with creativity and intelligence, is the first step in discovering why two individuals who are just as creative and intelligent would differ in their humor style of choice.

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Nov 23rd, 12:30 PM Nov 23rd, 12:45 PM

The Dynamics of Intelligence and Creativity and their Relationship to Humor Styles and Tendencies

Markstein 203

Intelligence and creativity have been found to strongly correlate to an individual’s tendency to seek out humor. Additionally, different humor styles have been identified: two associated with negative mental health (aggressive and self-defeating humor) and two associated with positive mental health (affiliative and self-enhancing). The current study aimed to not only use intelligence and creativity as predictors for how necessary humor is in an individual’s life but also investigate how both traits relate to specific humor styles to answer the following research questions: 1. Do creativity and intelligence predict an individual’s need for humor? 2. Do creativity and intelligence predict specific humor styles? To investigate these research questions, three surveys will be administered to participants to determine their creativity, need for humor, and humor styles. Afterwards, an intelligence test will be administered. Path analyses will be used to analyze the full data once data collection has been completed. Results from the current study can help us better understand humor. Results may also suggest that class clowns might be more intelligent than others think, but also susceptible to negative mental health outcomes. At the same time, establishing this relationship between specific humor styles with creativity and intelligence, is the first step in discovering why two individuals who are just as creative and intelligent would differ in their humor style of choice.