Presentation Title

Controlling Contrast Effects in Parent Ratings of Sibling Temperament

Faculty Mentor

HyeSun Lee, California State University, Channel Islands

Start Date

23-11-2019 12:45 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:00 PM

Location

Markstein 203

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Parent rating scales remain the most common method for assessing child behavior, personality, and temperament. Contrast bias, the tendency to exaggerate differences between two individuals, has been shown to affect parent ratings of siblings and may be an undetected flaw in research that measures the behavior of only one child. This project seeks to determine whether contrast bias and effects can be reduced by altering the assessment instructions. Twenty parents in the study completed three identical rating scales about two of their own children over six weeks, at a rate of one survey every two weeks. Each scale consisted of 40 items selected from the Children’s Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ; Rothbart, Ahadi, Hershey, & Fisher, 2001) and the Temperament in Middle Childhood Questionnaire (TMCQ; Simonds & Rothbart, 2004) to measure activity level and shyness in children ages four through ten. The surveys represent three test conditions: the “typical” instructions, in which participants were asked to complete the questionnaire about their children, the “individualized” instructions, in which participants were asked to complete the questionnaire by rating each child individually, and the “explanatory” instructions, in which parents first read a description of contrast effects and then were instructed to rate each child individually. For counterbalancing, half of the participants rated their older child first while the other half rated their younger child first. We hypothesized that parent ratings of sibling pairs would show more similarity as they progressed through the test conditions in order, indicating reduced contrast bias in each condition. Difference scores between siblings were analyzed through repeated measures ANOVA. To maintain consistency with existing literature, the correlation of sibling scores in each test condition was also examined. Practical implications related to improving validity in the use of parent rating scales will be discussed during the presentation.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 12:45 PM Nov 23rd, 1:00 PM

Controlling Contrast Effects in Parent Ratings of Sibling Temperament

Markstein 203

Parent rating scales remain the most common method for assessing child behavior, personality, and temperament. Contrast bias, the tendency to exaggerate differences between two individuals, has been shown to affect parent ratings of siblings and may be an undetected flaw in research that measures the behavior of only one child. This project seeks to determine whether contrast bias and effects can be reduced by altering the assessment instructions. Twenty parents in the study completed three identical rating scales about two of their own children over six weeks, at a rate of one survey every two weeks. Each scale consisted of 40 items selected from the Children’s Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ; Rothbart, Ahadi, Hershey, & Fisher, 2001) and the Temperament in Middle Childhood Questionnaire (TMCQ; Simonds & Rothbart, 2004) to measure activity level and shyness in children ages four through ten. The surveys represent three test conditions: the “typical” instructions, in which participants were asked to complete the questionnaire about their children, the “individualized” instructions, in which participants were asked to complete the questionnaire by rating each child individually, and the “explanatory” instructions, in which parents first read a description of contrast effects and then were instructed to rate each child individually. For counterbalancing, half of the participants rated their older child first while the other half rated their younger child first. We hypothesized that parent ratings of sibling pairs would show more similarity as they progressed through the test conditions in order, indicating reduced contrast bias in each condition. Difference scores between siblings were analyzed through repeated measures ANOVA. To maintain consistency with existing literature, the correlation of sibling scores in each test condition was also examined. Practical implications related to improving validity in the use of parent rating scales will be discussed during the presentation.