Presentation Title

Self-esteem and Emotional Intelligence in Family Communication

Faculty Mentor

Tara Suwinyattichaiporn

Start Date

23-11-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:15 PM

Location

Markstein 203

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

This study focuses on family communication pattern and its connection with emotional intelligence and self-esteem in college student population. There are two types of family communication patterns that occur in the household. One of them is conversation orientation. Koerner and Fitzpatrick (2002) stated that this is “the degree to which families create a climate in which all family members are encouraged to participate in unrestrained interaction” (p. 39). In high conversation families, there is open and consistent communication. People who come from low conversation families differ from those who come from high conversation families. Koerner & Fitzpatrick (2002) identified the other family communication orientation is conformity orientation, which is “the degree to which family communication stresses a climate of homogeneity of attitudes, values, and beliefs” (p. 39). Curran and Allen (2016) and Kelly et al. (2002) both stated how families that have open, positive environments can result in their children having higher self-esteem. In terms of emotional intelligence, research has shown that children perform better in their academics, have higher social competence, better interpersonal relationships, and psychological well-being when their parents teach them to effectively understand and manage their emotions (Platsidou & Tsirogiannidou, 2016).

The participation pool consisted of 109 volunteers (n=109), 93 of which completed the entire survey (n=93). All of the participant’s data were gathered from college students in the Southern California area. Convenience sampling was used when recruiting participants for the survey. Out of the 109 participants, 54 identified as male (n=54) and 50 identified as female (n=50). Bivariate correlation was used to test two hypotheses. The results suggest that family’s conversation orientation is associated with young adults’ self-esteem and high conformity family communication style is associated with high emotional intelligence. Discussion of findings is provided in the study.

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Nov 23rd, 1:00 PM Nov 23rd, 1:15 PM

Self-esteem and Emotional Intelligence in Family Communication

Markstein 203

This study focuses on family communication pattern and its connection with emotional intelligence and self-esteem in college student population. There are two types of family communication patterns that occur in the household. One of them is conversation orientation. Koerner and Fitzpatrick (2002) stated that this is “the degree to which families create a climate in which all family members are encouraged to participate in unrestrained interaction” (p. 39). In high conversation families, there is open and consistent communication. People who come from low conversation families differ from those who come from high conversation families. Koerner & Fitzpatrick (2002) identified the other family communication orientation is conformity orientation, which is “the degree to which family communication stresses a climate of homogeneity of attitudes, values, and beliefs” (p. 39). Curran and Allen (2016) and Kelly et al. (2002) both stated how families that have open, positive environments can result in their children having higher self-esteem. In terms of emotional intelligence, research has shown that children perform better in their academics, have higher social competence, better interpersonal relationships, and psychological well-being when their parents teach them to effectively understand and manage their emotions (Platsidou & Tsirogiannidou, 2016).

The participation pool consisted of 109 volunteers (n=109), 93 of which completed the entire survey (n=93). All of the participant’s data were gathered from college students in the Southern California area. Convenience sampling was used when recruiting participants for the survey. Out of the 109 participants, 54 identified as male (n=54) and 50 identified as female (n=50). Bivariate correlation was used to test two hypotheses. The results suggest that family’s conversation orientation is associated with young adults’ self-esteem and high conformity family communication style is associated with high emotional intelligence. Discussion of findings is provided in the study.