Presentation Title

Gendered Motivations, Self-Confidence, and Successful Outcomes for Online Social Dating

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Misty Kolchakian

Start Date

23-11-2019 1:15 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:30 PM

Location

Markstein 203

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

As online social dating (OSD) is becoming more widely used among college students, this study sought to examine gendered motivations for using OSD as well as the relationship between self-confidence and OSD outcomes. The researchers hypothesized there would be a positive relationship between self-confidence and OSD outcomes, and that men would be more likely to seek OSD for a hookup (which was defined as a casual sexual encounter), whereas women would seek OSD for a boost in confidence. Prior research on college students and emerging adults support these hypotheses (e.g., Griffin, Canevello, & McAnulty, 2018). The sample consisted of 33 participants (22 women, 11 men) enrolled in at least one psychology class at Mount San Antonio College. Participants completed a Self-Confidence survey, a Dating App/Website Outcomes survey (both of which used a Likert scale), and an Online Dating Reasons survey (in which they circled their main reasons for utilizing OSD). The authors were unable to find significance in gender differences regarding motivations or in the relationship between self-confidence and OSD outcomes. In addition, no significant ethnicity differences were found in this study. One explanation for the study’s insignificant findings may be related to gender conformity, as Wilson, et. al. (2017) found that 27% of California teens are viewed as non gender conforming. Additionally, the underrepresentation of men, social desirability bias, and the fact that all participants were enrolled in a psychology course may have also contributed to the lack of significance. Further research considering the complexities of male psychosocial motivations and additional personality characteristics, such as thoughtfulness and extraversion, should be examined to benefit those using these platforms. Finally, the role of race in motivation to engage in OSD should be explored with a larger sample size of varying ethnic backgrounds.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 1:15 PM Nov 23rd, 1:30 PM

Gendered Motivations, Self-Confidence, and Successful Outcomes for Online Social Dating

Markstein 203

As online social dating (OSD) is becoming more widely used among college students, this study sought to examine gendered motivations for using OSD as well as the relationship between self-confidence and OSD outcomes. The researchers hypothesized there would be a positive relationship between self-confidence and OSD outcomes, and that men would be more likely to seek OSD for a hookup (which was defined as a casual sexual encounter), whereas women would seek OSD for a boost in confidence. Prior research on college students and emerging adults support these hypotheses (e.g., Griffin, Canevello, & McAnulty, 2018). The sample consisted of 33 participants (22 women, 11 men) enrolled in at least one psychology class at Mount San Antonio College. Participants completed a Self-Confidence survey, a Dating App/Website Outcomes survey (both of which used a Likert scale), and an Online Dating Reasons survey (in which they circled their main reasons for utilizing OSD). The authors were unable to find significance in gender differences regarding motivations or in the relationship between self-confidence and OSD outcomes. In addition, no significant ethnicity differences were found in this study. One explanation for the study’s insignificant findings may be related to gender conformity, as Wilson, et. al. (2017) found that 27% of California teens are viewed as non gender conforming. Additionally, the underrepresentation of men, social desirability bias, and the fact that all participants were enrolled in a psychology course may have also contributed to the lack of significance. Further research considering the complexities of male psychosocial motivations and additional personality characteristics, such as thoughtfulness and extraversion, should be examined to benefit those using these platforms. Finally, the role of race in motivation to engage in OSD should be explored with a larger sample size of varying ethnic backgrounds.