Presentation Title

The role of independence and self-reliance on parenting stress in Mexican-American emerging and young adults

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Kimberly D'Anna-Hernandez

Start Date

23-11-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:45 PM

Location

Markstein 203

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Emerging adulthood is the developmental stage commonly seen in Western culture where individuals no longer identify as adolescents but have yet to assume their role as adults. As individuals gradually emerge into adulthood through the ages of 18-25, this extra time allows for exploration in identity, work, and relationships. Marriage and parenthood are commonly held traditional markers of adulthood, however, many emerging adults view independence and self-reliance as more crucial to attaining adult status. Previous research suggests a different pattern between European Americans and Mexican-Americans due to the higher chance of becoming parents earlier in life for Mexican-Americans. Mexican-Americans are the fastest growing racial-ethnic driven by birth rates, thus further research is needed to better understand their journey to adulthood and parenthood. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the difference in parenting stress between individuals in the emerging adulthood stage and in the young adulthood stage (26-40). It was hypothesized that emerging adult mothers would experience more parenting stress than young adult mothers and that independence and self-reliance may be protective against parenting stress. Mexican-American women (N = 126) ages 18-40 completed questionnaires after pregnancy to assess parenting stress and independence and self-reliance. There was no significant difference in parenting stress between the two age groups F (1, 122) = .463, p = .497. Furthermore, independence and self-reliance did not moderate the relationship between parenting stress and mother age group (R2 = .0067, B = -.5390, SE= .5.990, t = -.6539, p = .5144). This may be due to Mexican-Americans placing higher values on collectivistic criteria for adulthood such as familism. Further research should explore consequences for individuals who do not gradually transition into adulthood.

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Nov 23rd, 1:30 PM Nov 23rd, 1:45 PM

The role of independence and self-reliance on parenting stress in Mexican-American emerging and young adults

Markstein 203

Emerging adulthood is the developmental stage commonly seen in Western culture where individuals no longer identify as adolescents but have yet to assume their role as adults. As individuals gradually emerge into adulthood through the ages of 18-25, this extra time allows for exploration in identity, work, and relationships. Marriage and parenthood are commonly held traditional markers of adulthood, however, many emerging adults view independence and self-reliance as more crucial to attaining adult status. Previous research suggests a different pattern between European Americans and Mexican-Americans due to the higher chance of becoming parents earlier in life for Mexican-Americans. Mexican-Americans are the fastest growing racial-ethnic driven by birth rates, thus further research is needed to better understand their journey to adulthood and parenthood. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the difference in parenting stress between individuals in the emerging adulthood stage and in the young adulthood stage (26-40). It was hypothesized that emerging adult mothers would experience more parenting stress than young adult mothers and that independence and self-reliance may be protective against parenting stress. Mexican-American women (N = 126) ages 18-40 completed questionnaires after pregnancy to assess parenting stress and independence and self-reliance. There was no significant difference in parenting stress between the two age groups F (1, 122) = .463, p = .497. Furthermore, independence and self-reliance did not moderate the relationship between parenting stress and mother age group (R2 = .0067, B = -.5390, SE= .5.990, t = -.6539, p = .5144). This may be due to Mexican-Americans placing higher values on collectivistic criteria for adulthood such as familism. Further research should explore consequences for individuals who do not gradually transition into adulthood.