Presentation Title

Biophysical Properties of Alkenone Films

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Carlos Luna & Dr. Betsy Read

Start Date

23-11-2019 12:45 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:00 PM

Location

Markstein 208

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The synthesis of Alkenone Thin Films have furthered the practical application of Alkenones as an alternative to inorganic wax based products. Alkenones are large chained unsaturated methyl and ethyl n-ketones with many unidentified characteristics. Alkenones are produced by marine algae which can be cultured and are abundant in the ocean. Recent studies suggest Alkenones possess UV absorbing properties as well as a degree of hydrophobicity ideal for biomedical applications. To further determine if alkenones produced by marine algae show characteristics of a wax, Alkenones were isolated from marine coccolithophorid E. huxleyi in a chloroform solution. A monolayer of alkenones at the air-water interface was formed in a Langmuir Trough. We used the Thin Film Deposition Method to create a layer-by-layer thin film of alkenones in a glass substrate. We analyzed the hydrophobicity by measuring the contact angle of water droplets. We also analyzed the UV absorption of alkenone thin films using a spectrophotometer. Biocompatibility was tested by plating human adipose-derived stem cells on alkenone thin films with fibronectin for cell adhesion. We tested antimicrobial and antifungal properties by measuring the zone of inhibition of Candida albicans & Micrococcus luteus. We found that Alkenone Thin Film UV absorption peaked at 400-600nm. Thin films of alkenones showed a certain level of hydrophobicity with a contact angle of 70 degrees. Human adipose-derived stem cells proliferated and attached to the alkenone thin films. Additionally, we found that Alkenones inhibited the growth of Candida albicans & Micrococcus luteus. These results seem to indicate that alkenone films could become a sustainable wax alternative. Furthermore, alkenone thin films demonstrated other interesting physical properties such as UV adsorption, biocompatibility, and antimicrobial properties. In the future, we will explore more potential applications for alkenone films.

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Nov 23rd, 12:45 PM Nov 23rd, 1:00 PM

Biophysical Properties of Alkenone Films

Markstein 208

The synthesis of Alkenone Thin Films have furthered the practical application of Alkenones as an alternative to inorganic wax based products. Alkenones are large chained unsaturated methyl and ethyl n-ketones with many unidentified characteristics. Alkenones are produced by marine algae which can be cultured and are abundant in the ocean. Recent studies suggest Alkenones possess UV absorbing properties as well as a degree of hydrophobicity ideal for biomedical applications. To further determine if alkenones produced by marine algae show characteristics of a wax, Alkenones were isolated from marine coccolithophorid E. huxleyi in a chloroform solution. A monolayer of alkenones at the air-water interface was formed in a Langmuir Trough. We used the Thin Film Deposition Method to create a layer-by-layer thin film of alkenones in a glass substrate. We analyzed the hydrophobicity by measuring the contact angle of water droplets. We also analyzed the UV absorption of alkenone thin films using a spectrophotometer. Biocompatibility was tested by plating human adipose-derived stem cells on alkenone thin films with fibronectin for cell adhesion. We tested antimicrobial and antifungal properties by measuring the zone of inhibition of Candida albicans & Micrococcus luteus. We found that Alkenone Thin Film UV absorption peaked at 400-600nm. Thin films of alkenones showed a certain level of hydrophobicity with a contact angle of 70 degrees. Human adipose-derived stem cells proliferated and attached to the alkenone thin films. Additionally, we found that Alkenones inhibited the growth of Candida albicans & Micrococcus luteus. These results seem to indicate that alkenone films could become a sustainable wax alternative. Furthermore, alkenone thin films demonstrated other interesting physical properties such as UV adsorption, biocompatibility, and antimicrobial properties. In the future, we will explore more potential applications for alkenone films.