Presentation Title

Red Light-Blue Light: Alkenone Production in Isochrysis galbana Is Enhanced by Red Light, while Growth is Optimized under Blue Light

Faculty Mentor

Betsy Read

Start Date

23-11-2019 1:15 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:30 PM

Location

Markstein 208

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Isochrysis galbana is commonly used as a food source in the aquaculture industry because of its nutritional content and the ease with which it can be cultured and harvested. In addition to being a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, Isochrysis galbana is one of five species of algae that produce alkenones. Alkenones are very long chains fatty acids that contain between 35 and 41 carbon atoms and between 1 and 5 trans double bonds. While the genes and proteins involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of alkenones remain largely unknown, their ability to absorb UV radiation, and the antifungal and antibacterial properties they exhibit, suggests they may have some valuable commercial applications. Because of these potential commercial applications, the focus of our lab is to determine optimal conditions to maximize alkenone biosynthesis and growth of I. galbana. In this experiment, we determined the effects of different colored lights on the growth and alkenone production when I. galbana was cultured under different colored lights. Cell were grown for 14 days under constant illumination with green, orange, yellow, blue, red, violet, and white lights. Cultures were monitored daily. Cell counts were performed using BD Accuri C6 flow cytometer. Lipid content was also assessed using Nile Red staining. After 14 days, cultures were harvested, and total lipids were extracted by using organic solvents. Neutral lipids were further purified using silica chromatography and profiled by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Alkenone productivity was highest under the red light while growth of I. galbana was maximal under the blue light. A total of seven alkenones species were identified in I. galbana across the different colored lights. Future research will be directed at fine-tuning conditions to maximize the production of individual alkenones, and the genes and proteins involved in their biosynthesis.

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Nov 23rd, 1:15 PM Nov 23rd, 1:30 PM

Red Light-Blue Light: Alkenone Production in Isochrysis galbana Is Enhanced by Red Light, while Growth is Optimized under Blue Light

Markstein 208

Isochrysis galbana is commonly used as a food source in the aquaculture industry because of its nutritional content and the ease with which it can be cultured and harvested. In addition to being a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, Isochrysis galbana is one of five species of algae that produce alkenones. Alkenones are very long chains fatty acids that contain between 35 and 41 carbon atoms and between 1 and 5 trans double bonds. While the genes and proteins involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of alkenones remain largely unknown, their ability to absorb UV radiation, and the antifungal and antibacterial properties they exhibit, suggests they may have some valuable commercial applications. Because of these potential commercial applications, the focus of our lab is to determine optimal conditions to maximize alkenone biosynthesis and growth of I. galbana. In this experiment, we determined the effects of different colored lights on the growth and alkenone production when I. galbana was cultured under different colored lights. Cell were grown for 14 days under constant illumination with green, orange, yellow, blue, red, violet, and white lights. Cultures were monitored daily. Cell counts were performed using BD Accuri C6 flow cytometer. Lipid content was also assessed using Nile Red staining. After 14 days, cultures were harvested, and total lipids were extracted by using organic solvents. Neutral lipids were further purified using silica chromatography and profiled by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Alkenone productivity was highest under the red light while growth of I. galbana was maximal under the blue light. A total of seven alkenones species were identified in I. galbana across the different colored lights. Future research will be directed at fine-tuning conditions to maximize the production of individual alkenones, and the genes and proteins involved in their biosynthesis.