Presentation Title

Transactivation and Mitochondrial Activity are Affected by High Temperature in C. elegans Sperm

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Lisa Petrella

Start Date

23-11-2019 12:30 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 12:45 PM

Location

Markstein 209

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Transactivation and Mitochondrial Activity are Affected by

High Temperature in C. elegans Sperm

Key Words: Male Fertility Loss, High Temperature, Sterility, Sperm Activation, Seminal Fluid, Mitochondria, Sperm Motility, Fluorescent Microscopy, Genetic Crosses, C. elegans

Sexual reproduction has a conserved flaw in that it is temperature sensitive. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is fertile from 20-26°C but nearly sterile at 27°C. We investigated two potential aspects of male fertility that may be affected by 27°C: activation of sperm by seminal fluid and sperm mitochondrial function. In C. elegans immotile spermatids must be activated into motile sperm to fertilize an oocyte. There are two main pathways for sperm activation: the SPE-8 pathway in hermaphrodites and the TRY-5 pathway in male seminal fluid. Hermaphrodite sperm with a mutation in spe-8 can still be activated by TRY-5 in male seminal fluid, a process called transactivation. To test if the transactivation pathway is affected by 27°C, we crossed males treated with different temperatures to spe-8 mutant hermaphrodites. A decrease in hermaphrodite self-progeny would indicate a disruption of the transactivation pathway. Preliminary data indicate that the function of the TRY-5 transactivation pathway was significantly reduced when males were exposed to 27°C. Our previous work has suggested there is a reduction in sperm motility at high temperature and mitochondria produce the energy that power motile sperm. Male worms were raised at three temperature conditions, stained with a dye that stains functioning mitochondria, dissected sperm were imaged, and the fluorescence intensity of the mitochondria was calculated. There was a significant change in fluorescence intensity when sperm were exposed to 27°C. Our data suggest there are at least two mechanisms disrupted at high temperature that may lead to loss of male fertility at 27°C.

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Nov 23rd, 12:30 PM Nov 23rd, 12:45 PM

Transactivation and Mitochondrial Activity are Affected by High Temperature in C. elegans Sperm

Markstein 209

Transactivation and Mitochondrial Activity are Affected by

High Temperature in C. elegans Sperm

Key Words: Male Fertility Loss, High Temperature, Sterility, Sperm Activation, Seminal Fluid, Mitochondria, Sperm Motility, Fluorescent Microscopy, Genetic Crosses, C. elegans

Sexual reproduction has a conserved flaw in that it is temperature sensitive. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is fertile from 20-26°C but nearly sterile at 27°C. We investigated two potential aspects of male fertility that may be affected by 27°C: activation of sperm by seminal fluid and sperm mitochondrial function. In C. elegans immotile spermatids must be activated into motile sperm to fertilize an oocyte. There are two main pathways for sperm activation: the SPE-8 pathway in hermaphrodites and the TRY-5 pathway in male seminal fluid. Hermaphrodite sperm with a mutation in spe-8 can still be activated by TRY-5 in male seminal fluid, a process called transactivation. To test if the transactivation pathway is affected by 27°C, we crossed males treated with different temperatures to spe-8 mutant hermaphrodites. A decrease in hermaphrodite self-progeny would indicate a disruption of the transactivation pathway. Preliminary data indicate that the function of the TRY-5 transactivation pathway was significantly reduced when males were exposed to 27°C. Our previous work has suggested there is a reduction in sperm motility at high temperature and mitochondria produce the energy that power motile sperm. Male worms were raised at three temperature conditions, stained with a dye that stains functioning mitochondria, dissected sperm were imaged, and the fluorescence intensity of the mitochondria was calculated. There was a significant change in fluorescence intensity when sperm were exposed to 27°C. Our data suggest there are at least two mechanisms disrupted at high temperature that may lead to loss of male fertility at 27°C.