Presentation Title

Characterizing Changes in the Colonic Epithelium of Lrig3 Null Mice

Faculty Mentor

Anne E. Zemper

Start Date

23-11-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:15 PM

Location

Markstein 209

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The lining of the colon, or colonic epithelium, is a very dynamic and highly regulated tissue in the human body. Colonic stem cells are a key component of this tissue, and they make up the stem cell niche. The colonic epithelium is a very dynamic tissue and regeneration occurs on a weekly basis. The proteins responsible for directing this careful regenerative process are still being discovered. Two critical regulatory proteins, Lrig1 and Lrig3, have been shown to modulate the EGFR pathway, a key signaling pathway for growth and differentiations. Unpublished data from the Zemper Lab found Lrig1, a colonic stem cell marker, to be expressed significantly higher in the crypt of Lrig3 null mice, suggesting an expansion of the colonic stem cell niche. Morphologically, Lrig3 null mice have shown an increase in total mucosal area, which could either be attributed to an increase in number of cells or an increase in cell size. H&E staining revealed that the increase in mucosal area was correlated with a significant increase in the number of cells. This led us to hypothesize that an increase in colon crypt height correlates with an expansion of the stem cell niche. To test this, we used immunostaining and fluorescent microscopy to quantify and characterize colonic stem and differentiated cell markers. The crypts of Lrig3 null mice were characterized based on their cellular composition, heterogeneity, and positional data in comparison to wildtype mice. In the absence of Lrig3 in the colonic epithelium, a significant increase in the number of support cells in the stem cell niche was found. This data could suggest further implications in growth and homeostasis, a key process in the crypt. These findings may provide insight about colon recovery from inflammatory diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, which affect a large percent of the human population.

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Nov 23rd, 1:00 PM Nov 23rd, 1:15 PM

Characterizing Changes in the Colonic Epithelium of Lrig3 Null Mice

Markstein 209

The lining of the colon, or colonic epithelium, is a very dynamic and highly regulated tissue in the human body. Colonic stem cells are a key component of this tissue, and they make up the stem cell niche. The colonic epithelium is a very dynamic tissue and regeneration occurs on a weekly basis. The proteins responsible for directing this careful regenerative process are still being discovered. Two critical regulatory proteins, Lrig1 and Lrig3, have been shown to modulate the EGFR pathway, a key signaling pathway for growth and differentiations. Unpublished data from the Zemper Lab found Lrig1, a colonic stem cell marker, to be expressed significantly higher in the crypt of Lrig3 null mice, suggesting an expansion of the colonic stem cell niche. Morphologically, Lrig3 null mice have shown an increase in total mucosal area, which could either be attributed to an increase in number of cells or an increase in cell size. H&E staining revealed that the increase in mucosal area was correlated with a significant increase in the number of cells. This led us to hypothesize that an increase in colon crypt height correlates with an expansion of the stem cell niche. To test this, we used immunostaining and fluorescent microscopy to quantify and characterize colonic stem and differentiated cell markers. The crypts of Lrig3 null mice were characterized based on their cellular composition, heterogeneity, and positional data in comparison to wildtype mice. In the absence of Lrig3 in the colonic epithelium, a significant increase in the number of support cells in the stem cell niche was found. This data could suggest further implications in growth and homeostasis, a key process in the crypt. These findings may provide insight about colon recovery from inflammatory diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, which affect a large percent of the human population.