Presentation Title

Pollinator Corridor Design for Native Invertebrates in Southern California

Faculty Mentor

Christina Simokat

Start Date

23-11-2019 12:45 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:00 PM

Location

Markstein 210

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Pollinator Corridor Design for Native Invertebrates in Southern California

Young, Bailey; Hadley, Bethany; Hosey, Torrey and Simokat, Christina.

As invertebrate pollinator species are declining globally, it becomes increasingly important to improve and increase habitat for wild pollinators as an integral part of conserving native habitats (Pennsylvania State University, 2019). Best practices are being developed for building, revegetating, and managing gardens and landscapes that will support and promote native pollinators (Lundin et al; 2019). Research is needed to determine best practices for design of movement corridors that link pollinator-supporting habitat. We are monitoring the types of invertebrate pollinators found in two pollinator-friendly gardens on the campus of CSU San Marcos in southern California over a 12-month period. This study attempts to determine the native invertebrate pollinator with the smallest daily range of movement common to both gardens, so this species or group may be used as the basis for corridor design.

References

  1. Identifying native plants for coordinated habitat management of arthropod pollinators, herbivores and natural enemies. Lundin, Ola ; Ward, Kimiora L. ; Williams, Neal M. Journal of Applied Ecology, March 2019, Vol.56(3), pp.665-676

  2. Minnesota Department of Agriculture. (2019). Insect Pollinator Best Management Practices for Minnesota Yards and Gardens. Retrieved August 1, 2019, from https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1265183.pdf

  3. Pennsylvania State University. (n.d.). Globally, pollinators are in decline (Center for Pollinator Research). Retrieved August 1, 2019, from https://ento.psu.edu/pollinators/resources-and-outreach/globally-pollinators-are-in-decline

  4. US Forest Service. (2015, May 11). Pollinator-Friendly Best Management Practices for Federal Lands. Retrieved August 1, 2019, from https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/pollinators/BMPs/documents/PollinatorFriendlyBMPsFederalLandsDRAFT05152015.pdf

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Nov 23rd, 12:45 PM Nov 23rd, 1:00 PM

Pollinator Corridor Design for Native Invertebrates in Southern California

Markstein 210

Pollinator Corridor Design for Native Invertebrates in Southern California

Young, Bailey; Hadley, Bethany; Hosey, Torrey and Simokat, Christina.

As invertebrate pollinator species are declining globally, it becomes increasingly important to improve and increase habitat for wild pollinators as an integral part of conserving native habitats (Pennsylvania State University, 2019). Best practices are being developed for building, revegetating, and managing gardens and landscapes that will support and promote native pollinators (Lundin et al; 2019). Research is needed to determine best practices for design of movement corridors that link pollinator-supporting habitat. We are monitoring the types of invertebrate pollinators found in two pollinator-friendly gardens on the campus of CSU San Marcos in southern California over a 12-month period. This study attempts to determine the native invertebrate pollinator with the smallest daily range of movement common to both gardens, so this species or group may be used as the basis for corridor design.

References

  1. Identifying native plants for coordinated habitat management of arthropod pollinators, herbivores and natural enemies. Lundin, Ola ; Ward, Kimiora L. ; Williams, Neal M. Journal of Applied Ecology, March 2019, Vol.56(3), pp.665-676

  2. Minnesota Department of Agriculture. (2019). Insect Pollinator Best Management Practices for Minnesota Yards and Gardens. Retrieved August 1, 2019, from https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1265183.pdf

  3. Pennsylvania State University. (n.d.). Globally, pollinators are in decline (Center for Pollinator Research). Retrieved August 1, 2019, from https://ento.psu.edu/pollinators/resources-and-outreach/globally-pollinators-are-in-decline

  4. US Forest Service. (2015, May 11). Pollinator-Friendly Best Management Practices for Federal Lands. Retrieved August 1, 2019, from https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/pollinators/BMPs/documents/PollinatorFriendlyBMPsFederalLandsDRAFT05152015.pdf