Presentation Title

Food Anticipatory Activity in Steers

Faculty Mentor

Juanita Jellyman, Andrew Steele, Elizabeth Scordato

Start Date

23-11-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:15 PM

Location

Markstein 210

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

When food availability is restricted to a certain time each day, some animals exhibit an increase in locomotor activity prior to the scheduled feeding time1. This increase in locomotor activity is known as food-anticipatory activity. In mice, food anticipatory activity occurs even if the scheduled feeding occurs during the daytime when these nocturnal laboratory animals would normally be resting1. Food anticipatory activity has been demonstrated in laboratory animals1 and in some farm animals, such as sheep2. Whether time-restricted feeding induces food anticipatory behavior in steers is unknown. Sixteen steers were used in the study. The morning-fed group (n=8) were fed at 6am and the evening group were fed at 6pm (n=8). In both groups, any remaining food was removed from the pen 12-hours later. Steers were observed at five different times during the day: from 5.15am to 6.00am (before the morning-fed group received food); from 6.00am to 6.45am (after the morning-fed group received food); from 12.00pm to 12.45pm (when no food was given to either group); from 5.15pm to 6.00pm (before the evening-fed group received food); and from 6.00pm to 6.45pm (after the evening-fed group received food). The frequency of various typical cattle behaviors was recorded every five minutes using a scan-sampling method. The frequency of food anticipatory activities in morning-fed and evening-fed steers was highest during their respective pre-feeding time periods. During the pre-feeding time period the amount of food anticipatory activity recorded was higher in the evening-fed than the morning-fed group (p < 0.05, ANOVA). There were no differences in ambulatory activity between the groups. Taken together, the data suggest that in steers, time-restricted feeding increases food anticipatory activity that is directed at their food bin but does not increase general locomotor activity.

1. Assali DR, Hsu CT, Gunapala KM, Aguayo A, McBurney M, Steele AD. Food anticipatory activity on a calorie-restricted diet is independent of Sirt1. PLoS One. 2018 Jun 25;13(6):e0199586.

2. Piccione, G., Giannetto, C., Marafioti, S., Casella, S., Assenza, A. and Fazio, F., 2011. Effect of different farming management on daily total locomotor activity in sheep. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 6(4), pp.243-247.

2. Piccione, G., Giannetto, C., Marafioti, S., Casella, S., Assenza, A. and Fazio, F., 2011. Effect of different farming management on daily total locomotor activity in sheep. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 6(4), pp.243-247.

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Nov 23rd, 1:00 PM Nov 23rd, 1:15 PM

Food Anticipatory Activity in Steers

Markstein 210

When food availability is restricted to a certain time each day, some animals exhibit an increase in locomotor activity prior to the scheduled feeding time1. This increase in locomotor activity is known as food-anticipatory activity. In mice, food anticipatory activity occurs even if the scheduled feeding occurs during the daytime when these nocturnal laboratory animals would normally be resting1. Food anticipatory activity has been demonstrated in laboratory animals1 and in some farm animals, such as sheep2. Whether time-restricted feeding induces food anticipatory behavior in steers is unknown. Sixteen steers were used in the study. The morning-fed group (n=8) were fed at 6am and the evening group were fed at 6pm (n=8). In both groups, any remaining food was removed from the pen 12-hours later. Steers were observed at five different times during the day: from 5.15am to 6.00am (before the morning-fed group received food); from 6.00am to 6.45am (after the morning-fed group received food); from 12.00pm to 12.45pm (when no food was given to either group); from 5.15pm to 6.00pm (before the evening-fed group received food); and from 6.00pm to 6.45pm (after the evening-fed group received food). The frequency of various typical cattle behaviors was recorded every five minutes using a scan-sampling method. The frequency of food anticipatory activities in morning-fed and evening-fed steers was highest during their respective pre-feeding time periods. During the pre-feeding time period the amount of food anticipatory activity recorded was higher in the evening-fed than the morning-fed group (p < 0.05, ANOVA). There were no differences in ambulatory activity between the groups. Taken together, the data suggest that in steers, time-restricted feeding increases food anticipatory activity that is directed at their food bin but does not increase general locomotor activity.

1. Assali DR, Hsu CT, Gunapala KM, Aguayo A, McBurney M, Steele AD. Food anticipatory activity on a calorie-restricted diet is independent of Sirt1. PLoS One. 2018 Jun 25;13(6):e0199586.

2. Piccione, G., Giannetto, C., Marafioti, S., Casella, S., Assenza, A. and Fazio, F., 2011. Effect of different farming management on daily total locomotor activity in sheep. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 6(4), pp.243-247.

2. Piccione, G., Giannetto, C., Marafioti, S., Casella, S., Assenza, A. and Fazio, F., 2011. Effect of different farming management on daily total locomotor activity in sheep. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 6(4), pp.243-247.