Presentation Title

Sensory Comparison of Gluten Free and Glutenous Bread and Pasta Products

Faculty Mentor

Yao Olive Li, Gabriel Davidov Pardo

Start Date

23-11-2019 12:30 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 12:45 PM

Location

Markstein 213

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Wheat is one of the top three most important foodstuffs and commodities in the world with approximately 600 tonnes harvested each year. Wheat is an important constituent of many products, mainly bread and pasta products. Wheat flour has the ability to form gluten; a protein matrix created from agitation of two proteins, glutenin and gliadin, in the presence of water. The matrix is mostly formed during the mixing and extrusion process. In breads gluten provides elastoplastic properties, in pasta it provides structure and rigidity. An estimated of 0.71% of Americans have Celiac disease, an adverse effect in the small intestine caused by the consumption of gluten. Beyond Celiac disease, many suffer from wheat allergies and gluten intolerances, many more maintain gluten free diets due to sensitivities and millions more do so for weight loss or perceived healthfulness; an estimated 20% of American consumers take active steps towards a gluten free diet. Gluten-free products often have reduced texture and sensory characteristics compared to their glutenous counterparts, often leading to decreased consumption. The objective of this work was to determine sensory aspects of gluten-free and glutenous bread and pasta products and relate them to their chemical properties. For pasta: an acceptance sensory test was conducted between semolina, whole wheat, and protein enriched gluten-free pasta (n=137). Physico-chemical tests were conducted to determine differences in protein matrix formation and structure. For bread: a discriminatory (n=26), descriptive (n=13), and acceptance test (n=53) were conducted between glutenous and gluten-free bread. It was found that differences in texture between products led to both higher discrimination and differences in preference, and that these differences may be viewed at a chemical level. Overall it was determined that glutenous and gluten-free breads have significantly different hedonic scores; however, the addition of protein may mimic the gluten network leading to changed sensorial aspects.

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Nov 23rd, 12:30 PM Nov 23rd, 12:45 PM

Sensory Comparison of Gluten Free and Glutenous Bread and Pasta Products

Markstein 213

Wheat is one of the top three most important foodstuffs and commodities in the world with approximately 600 tonnes harvested each year. Wheat is an important constituent of many products, mainly bread and pasta products. Wheat flour has the ability to form gluten; a protein matrix created from agitation of two proteins, glutenin and gliadin, in the presence of water. The matrix is mostly formed during the mixing and extrusion process. In breads gluten provides elastoplastic properties, in pasta it provides structure and rigidity. An estimated of 0.71% of Americans have Celiac disease, an adverse effect in the small intestine caused by the consumption of gluten. Beyond Celiac disease, many suffer from wheat allergies and gluten intolerances, many more maintain gluten free diets due to sensitivities and millions more do so for weight loss or perceived healthfulness; an estimated 20% of American consumers take active steps towards a gluten free diet. Gluten-free products often have reduced texture and sensory characteristics compared to their glutenous counterparts, often leading to decreased consumption. The objective of this work was to determine sensory aspects of gluten-free and glutenous bread and pasta products and relate them to their chemical properties. For pasta: an acceptance sensory test was conducted between semolina, whole wheat, and protein enriched gluten-free pasta (n=137). Physico-chemical tests were conducted to determine differences in protein matrix formation and structure. For bread: a discriminatory (n=26), descriptive (n=13), and acceptance test (n=53) were conducted between glutenous and gluten-free bread. It was found that differences in texture between products led to both higher discrimination and differences in preference, and that these differences may be viewed at a chemical level. Overall it was determined that glutenous and gluten-free breads have significantly different hedonic scores; however, the addition of protein may mimic the gluten network leading to changed sensorial aspects.