Presentation Title

Soothing Relationships in East Asia with Nongovernmental Diplomacy

Presenter Information

Shinsaku TakikawaFollow

Faculty Mentor

Debbie Goss

Start Date

23-11-2019 12:45 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:00 PM

Location

Markstein 301

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

East Asia has been experiencing considerable tension despite governmental diplomatic efforts. For example, at the time of the Tiananmen Square protest, the Chinese government’s attempts at conflict resolution failed. Today, the Hong Kong people’s resistance to the government persists despite government attempts to resolve conflicts. Given these failed attempts, this research aims to seek alternative approaches to diplomacy in these East Asian countries. I employed a qualitative research method using an in-depth interview with my father to explore alternative approaches to conflict resolution. In the interview, my father shared his study abroad experiences in China from 1988 to 1990, which was during the peak of the Tiananmen Square protest. He was outraged by the government’s violent approach to the Chinese people. He affirmed his distrust in the Chinese government and his trust in the people. Toward the end of his study abroad, my father worked with Dr. Daisaku Ikeda on a cultural photo exhibit, which significantly influenced his perspectives on alternative approaches to diplomacy. For example, My father gained insight from Dr. Ikeda about the importance of non-governmental diplomacy, diplomacy led by organizations or individuals unrelated to a government, as a bridge to East Asian relations. Scholars have argued that non-governmental diplomacy in the form of soft-power, non-military and non-economic power, deserves more attention. This soft-power can manifest through cultural exchange, sports, or music. Currently, my father works at a non-governmental organization in Japan, where he supports guests from East Asia. In this role, he often draws on his experience during his study abroad in China. My father also shared his perspectives about the current crisis in Hong Kong and the importance of East Asian diplomacy. This study concludes that both governmental and non-governmental diplomacy in the form of soft-power are critical to harmonious relationships in East Asia.

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Nov 23rd, 12:45 PM Nov 23rd, 1:00 PM

Soothing Relationships in East Asia with Nongovernmental Diplomacy

Markstein 301

East Asia has been experiencing considerable tension despite governmental diplomatic efforts. For example, at the time of the Tiananmen Square protest, the Chinese government’s attempts at conflict resolution failed. Today, the Hong Kong people’s resistance to the government persists despite government attempts to resolve conflicts. Given these failed attempts, this research aims to seek alternative approaches to diplomacy in these East Asian countries. I employed a qualitative research method using an in-depth interview with my father to explore alternative approaches to conflict resolution. In the interview, my father shared his study abroad experiences in China from 1988 to 1990, which was during the peak of the Tiananmen Square protest. He was outraged by the government’s violent approach to the Chinese people. He affirmed his distrust in the Chinese government and his trust in the people. Toward the end of his study abroad, my father worked with Dr. Daisaku Ikeda on a cultural photo exhibit, which significantly influenced his perspectives on alternative approaches to diplomacy. For example, My father gained insight from Dr. Ikeda about the importance of non-governmental diplomacy, diplomacy led by organizations or individuals unrelated to a government, as a bridge to East Asian relations. Scholars have argued that non-governmental diplomacy in the form of soft-power, non-military and non-economic power, deserves more attention. This soft-power can manifest through cultural exchange, sports, or music. Currently, my father works at a non-governmental organization in Japan, where he supports guests from East Asia. In this role, he often draws on his experience during his study abroad in China. My father also shared his perspectives about the current crisis in Hong Kong and the importance of East Asian diplomacy. This study concludes that both governmental and non-governmental diplomacy in the form of soft-power are critical to harmonious relationships in East Asia.