Presentation Title

Privateers of the Caribbean

Presenter Information

Alex BarrFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Samuel Claussen

Start Date

23-11-2019 1:15 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:30 PM

Location

Markstein 301

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

The Spanish, French, English, and Dutch empires fought for control of the resources that the New World colonies held, waging wars on mainland Europe and abroad in order to gain authority over the trade routes and new global markets. In order to reduce violence and protect merchants and traders, intellectuals advocated for international peace and rights for traders and merchants, and treaties were passed that created some semblance of international law. Following this, empires turned to mercenary, private ships known as privateers, who acted as agents of the empire, employing any means necessary in order to disrupt or destroy enemy forces and trade operations. However, upon completing their objectives, many privateers continued to raid ships and other holdings. It was these former imperial agents that committed acts of piracy, ushering in The Golden Age of Piracy from approximately 1650-1725.

This research sought to answer what role pirates had in the age of empire and colonialism, and if Empires benefitted from the action of pirates. It is clear that under the guise of privateering, empires appeared to be loyal to trade and peace agreements, and kings could claim plausible deniability on the actions of Golden Age pirates that served their interests. The sources for this work fall into three categories: firstly, the philosophies and treaties that sought to bring order to the war filled seventeenth century; secondly, the writings of European officials that concerned privateering or piracy; and finally, the accounts of captains or crew members that served on privateering ships.

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Nov 23rd, 1:15 PM Nov 23rd, 1:30 PM

Privateers of the Caribbean

Markstein 301

The Spanish, French, English, and Dutch empires fought for control of the resources that the New World colonies held, waging wars on mainland Europe and abroad in order to gain authority over the trade routes and new global markets. In order to reduce violence and protect merchants and traders, intellectuals advocated for international peace and rights for traders and merchants, and treaties were passed that created some semblance of international law. Following this, empires turned to mercenary, private ships known as privateers, who acted as agents of the empire, employing any means necessary in order to disrupt or destroy enemy forces and trade operations. However, upon completing their objectives, many privateers continued to raid ships and other holdings. It was these former imperial agents that committed acts of piracy, ushering in The Golden Age of Piracy from approximately 1650-1725.

This research sought to answer what role pirates had in the age of empire and colonialism, and if Empires benefitted from the action of pirates. It is clear that under the guise of privateering, empires appeared to be loyal to trade and peace agreements, and kings could claim plausible deniability on the actions of Golden Age pirates that served their interests. The sources for this work fall into three categories: firstly, the philosophies and treaties that sought to bring order to the war filled seventeenth century; secondly, the writings of European officials that concerned privateering or piracy; and finally, the accounts of captains or crew members that served on privateering ships.