Presentation Title

Effect of Cold Atmospheric Plasma on Immune Cells

Faculty Mentor

Fengdong Cheng, Jie Chen, Eduardo M. Sotomayor, Dayun Yan, Michael Kiedar

Start Date

23-11-2019 1:15 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:30 PM

Location

Markstein 306

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Effect of Cold Atmospheric Plasma on Immune Cells

Author: Clarissa Garcia, California State University San Marcos

Mentors: Fengdong Cheng, Jie Chen, & Eduardo M. Sotomayor, Cancer Center, The George Washington University; Dayun Yan & Michael Keidar, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University

In recent years, the field of cancer immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer care. Treatment of patients with advanced cancers with checkpoint antibodies has resulted in impressive clinical responses and potential cures. However, not all patients benefit from these therapies and therefore novel immunotherapeutic approaches are needed. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), a type of ionized gas, has emerged as an innovative approach for cancer therapy given its antitumor effects in vitro as well as in vivo. Our preliminary data has demonstrated that upon CAP treatment, the viability of the murine naïve immune cells remained unaffected. Strikingly, we observed a significantly stronger immune activation of those CAP treated cells when compared with helium gas control. Briefly, in vitro exposure of peritoneal elicited macrophages (PEMs) to CAP triggers increased production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-6 and decreased production of IL-10 as well as diminished expression of PD-L1. We further hypothesized that CAP-treated PEMs could be better activators for antigen-specific T cells. Indeed, the antigen-presentation study showed that T-cells encountering antigen cultured with CAP-treated PEMs produced higher levels of IFN-g relative to T-cells cultured with control macrophages. These findings fuel our current project, which aims to study the effect of CAP on B-cell function. Understanding the modifications that occur to immune cells with CAP treatment can transform the way cancer is treated.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 1:15 PM Nov 23rd, 1:30 PM

Effect of Cold Atmospheric Plasma on Immune Cells

Markstein 306

Effect of Cold Atmospheric Plasma on Immune Cells

Author: Clarissa Garcia, California State University San Marcos

Mentors: Fengdong Cheng, Jie Chen, & Eduardo M. Sotomayor, Cancer Center, The George Washington University; Dayun Yan & Michael Keidar, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University

In recent years, the field of cancer immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer care. Treatment of patients with advanced cancers with checkpoint antibodies has resulted in impressive clinical responses and potential cures. However, not all patients benefit from these therapies and therefore novel immunotherapeutic approaches are needed. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), a type of ionized gas, has emerged as an innovative approach for cancer therapy given its antitumor effects in vitro as well as in vivo. Our preliminary data has demonstrated that upon CAP treatment, the viability of the murine naïve immune cells remained unaffected. Strikingly, we observed a significantly stronger immune activation of those CAP treated cells when compared with helium gas control. Briefly, in vitro exposure of peritoneal elicited macrophages (PEMs) to CAP triggers increased production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-6 and decreased production of IL-10 as well as diminished expression of PD-L1. We further hypothesized that CAP-treated PEMs could be better activators for antigen-specific T cells. Indeed, the antigen-presentation study showed that T-cells encountering antigen cultured with CAP-treated PEMs produced higher levels of IFN-g relative to T-cells cultured with control macrophages. These findings fuel our current project, which aims to study the effect of CAP on B-cell function. Understanding the modifications that occur to immune cells with CAP treatment can transform the way cancer is treated.