Presentation Title

Modeling and Measurements of Flow Around A Model City Block

Faculty Mentor

Marko Princevac

Start Date

23-11-2019 1:15 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:30 PM

Location

Markstein 102

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

The Laboratory for Environmental Flow Modeling recently fabricated a circulating water channel that can be used for various experiments. To enable such experiments, we researched how to create systems that could show and record the flow of the water. Experiments that can be accomplished in the channel include simulation of both air and water processes, such as air pollution or flow around fish. In an air pollution simulation, the water flows around a model of a city, which can be tracked using dye that is injected into the water. This required the creation of a dye injection system. The requirements for this system include easy deployment, minimal disturbance to the flow, and a consistent, controllable flow rate. Using a computational fluid dynamics simulation, we interpreted how the system would interact with flow pressure and velocity. Then, to track the dye, an overhead camera system was designed. Many variables were considered when designing this system, such as ease of use, strength, aesthetic, material, shape, and function. The use of the overhead camera in conjunction with a side camera allows for tracking in 3 dimensions. In the future, the combination of these two primary systems will allow for use of more advanced tracking methods, such as particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence. To conclude, the dye injection system provided a steady flow rate with little disturbance to the flow. The overhead camera system was successful in that it warranted many different camera positions, remained stable, and gave a clear view as to what was happening in the water. With these systems successfully installed and tested, the water channel now has the capability to properly track air pollution and other experiments. In this presentation, we will discuss the main design parameters, design iterations, and flow visualization results for different scenarios.

Keywords:

Airfoil

Camera system

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

Dye injection

Flow

Particle image velocimetry (PIV)

Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF)

Water channel

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 1:15 PM Nov 23rd, 1:30 PM

Modeling and Measurements of Flow Around A Model City Block

Markstein 102

The Laboratory for Environmental Flow Modeling recently fabricated a circulating water channel that can be used for various experiments. To enable such experiments, we researched how to create systems that could show and record the flow of the water. Experiments that can be accomplished in the channel include simulation of both air and water processes, such as air pollution or flow around fish. In an air pollution simulation, the water flows around a model of a city, which can be tracked using dye that is injected into the water. This required the creation of a dye injection system. The requirements for this system include easy deployment, minimal disturbance to the flow, and a consistent, controllable flow rate. Using a computational fluid dynamics simulation, we interpreted how the system would interact with flow pressure and velocity. Then, to track the dye, an overhead camera system was designed. Many variables were considered when designing this system, such as ease of use, strength, aesthetic, material, shape, and function. The use of the overhead camera in conjunction with a side camera allows for tracking in 3 dimensions. In the future, the combination of these two primary systems will allow for use of more advanced tracking methods, such as particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence. To conclude, the dye injection system provided a steady flow rate with little disturbance to the flow. The overhead camera system was successful in that it warranted many different camera positions, remained stable, and gave a clear view as to what was happening in the water. With these systems successfully installed and tested, the water channel now has the capability to properly track air pollution and other experiments. In this presentation, we will discuss the main design parameters, design iterations, and flow visualization results for different scenarios.

Keywords:

Airfoil

Camera system

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

Dye injection

Flow

Particle image velocimetry (PIV)

Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF)

Water channel