Presentation Title

Testing of Thermal Energy Storage using Reverse Osmosis Concentrate

Faculty Mentor

Reza Baghaei Lakeh

Start Date

23-11-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

23-11-2019 1:45 PM

Location

Markstein 102

Session

oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Reverse osmosis is a water purification process that separates salts and other particulates from water. This process creates potable water and a concentrated brine called reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC). Thermal energy storage (TES) is a process where a material (usually molten salts) is heated to store thermal energy during peak efficiency times and then extracted during non-peak efficiency times. The sunshot initiative is a Department of Energy initiative to reduce the total cost of concentrating solar power (CSP) to $0.03 per kWh by 2030. In order to do this, the cost of thermal energy storage must be significantly reduced.

When ROC is dumped into rivers and oceans, it causes extensive damage to local marine life, so a practical use for ROC is necessary. The proposed solution to reduce the cost of TES is to replace expensive, commonly used molten salts with ROC salts for use in thermal storage medium. A prototype was built and preliminary results show that ROC salts can be used as a thermal storage medium. A new charging and discharging method for the TES is currently being designed. It is hoped that the new design will increase the repeatability of the obtained results.

TES systems are commonly used for CSP plants. One of the more famous CSP plants is Ivanpah and is located at the California/Nevada border. This CSP system does not have thermal energy storage and needs about 4.5 hours a day of gas-fired boilers to preheat to operating temperatures; the equivalent of 16,500 average passenger cars. If Ivanpah used a molten salt TES system it would be expensive due to the size requirement. If ROC were used as a TES medium, it could be used to preheat Ivanpah and avoid the 92,200 tons of CO2 produced during the preheating process.

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Nov 23rd, 1:30 PM Nov 23rd, 1:45 PM

Testing of Thermal Energy Storage using Reverse Osmosis Concentrate

Markstein 102

Reverse osmosis is a water purification process that separates salts and other particulates from water. This process creates potable water and a concentrated brine called reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC). Thermal energy storage (TES) is a process where a material (usually molten salts) is heated to store thermal energy during peak efficiency times and then extracted during non-peak efficiency times. The sunshot initiative is a Department of Energy initiative to reduce the total cost of concentrating solar power (CSP) to $0.03 per kWh by 2030. In order to do this, the cost of thermal energy storage must be significantly reduced.

When ROC is dumped into rivers and oceans, it causes extensive damage to local marine life, so a practical use for ROC is necessary. The proposed solution to reduce the cost of TES is to replace expensive, commonly used molten salts with ROC salts for use in thermal storage medium. A prototype was built and preliminary results show that ROC salts can be used as a thermal storage medium. A new charging and discharging method for the TES is currently being designed. It is hoped that the new design will increase the repeatability of the obtained results.

TES systems are commonly used for CSP plants. One of the more famous CSP plants is Ivanpah and is located at the California/Nevada border. This CSP system does not have thermal energy storage and needs about 4.5 hours a day of gas-fired boilers to preheat to operating temperatures; the equivalent of 16,500 average passenger cars. If Ivanpah used a molten salt TES system it would be expensive due to the size requirement. If ROC were used as a TES medium, it could be used to preheat Ivanpah and avoid the 92,200 tons of CO2 produced during the preheating process.