Presentation Title

Ingredients, Infants, and Isotopes: An Analysis of Historic Glass from CA-SDI-8125 Los Peñasquitos Ranch House Archaeological Excavations

Faculty Mentor

George Timothy Gross Ph.D.

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

19

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Los Peñasquitos Ranch House, CA-SDI-8125 is located on ancestral Kumeyaay land in San Diego County, California. The adobe structure was built by Commandant, Francisco Maria Ruiz after he was granted the land by the Mexican government in 1823. The ranch has had multiple owners and was used as a residence, cattle ranch, bunkhouse, and hotel until the end of private ownership in 1974. Following analysis of an assemblage of 128 glass fragments from the 2015–2018 San Diego City College archaeological excavations, a minimum number of 31 individual containers was assessed. Research on five glass bottles with dates ranging from 1860–1943 provides insight into the demographics, economic status, and cultural affiliations of past ranch occupants. Fragments of two ketchup bottles suggest occupants consumed an Anglo-American diet, and fragments of a large-sized Mellin’s Infant Formula bottle confirms the presence of children at the site. A jar embossed, “J.H. Brough & Co. Liverpool” that contained imported salts from Liverpool, England was marketed in San Francisco as an ingredient in butter and cheese. This container suggests that subsistence practices may have been influenced by San Francisco, meaning occupants shared a cultural identity focused on regional versus local affiliations. A jar rim fragment that fluoresces under ultraviolet light was determined to contain at least one radioactive isotope following Geiger counter readings of 41 counts per minute at five minutes of exposure. Several uranium isotopes were used to color glass tableware items beginning in 1880, suggesting occupants had disposable income to spend on decorative items. Pairing historical documentation with the likely use of dairy products in both Mellin’s Infant formula and J.H. Brough & Co.’s salt calls attention to the budding field of bacteriology and its influence on subsistence practices at the ranch near the turn of the 20th century.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Ingredients, Infants, and Isotopes: An Analysis of Historic Glass from CA-SDI-8125 Los Peñasquitos Ranch House Archaeological Excavations

19

Los Peñasquitos Ranch House, CA-SDI-8125 is located on ancestral Kumeyaay land in San Diego County, California. The adobe structure was built by Commandant, Francisco Maria Ruiz after he was granted the land by the Mexican government in 1823. The ranch has had multiple owners and was used as a residence, cattle ranch, bunkhouse, and hotel until the end of private ownership in 1974. Following analysis of an assemblage of 128 glass fragments from the 2015–2018 San Diego City College archaeological excavations, a minimum number of 31 individual containers was assessed. Research on five glass bottles with dates ranging from 1860–1943 provides insight into the demographics, economic status, and cultural affiliations of past ranch occupants. Fragments of two ketchup bottles suggest occupants consumed an Anglo-American diet, and fragments of a large-sized Mellin’s Infant Formula bottle confirms the presence of children at the site. A jar embossed, “J.H. Brough & Co. Liverpool” that contained imported salts from Liverpool, England was marketed in San Francisco as an ingredient in butter and cheese. This container suggests that subsistence practices may have been influenced by San Francisco, meaning occupants shared a cultural identity focused on regional versus local affiliations. A jar rim fragment that fluoresces under ultraviolet light was determined to contain at least one radioactive isotope following Geiger counter readings of 41 counts per minute at five minutes of exposure. Several uranium isotopes were used to color glass tableware items beginning in 1880, suggesting occupants had disposable income to spend on decorative items. Pairing historical documentation with the likely use of dairy products in both Mellin’s Infant formula and J.H. Brough & Co.’s salt calls attention to the budding field of bacteriology and its influence on subsistence practices at the ranch near the turn of the 20th century.