Presentation Title

Application of Wireless Hand-held Devices for Storm Water Management Program (SWMP)

Faculty Mentor

Karno Ng

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

215

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Storm water is rainwater that falls onto the surfaces of roads, buildings, driveways, etc; it is then collected by a network of storm water drainage. When storm water travels to the drainage, it collects several types of oils, debris, bacteria and pollutants that are transferred to the oceans, lakes, and ponds. Storm water from CSUSM directly deposits into the ocean. The California Waterboards’ Municipal Storm Water Program issues permits based on population, the Phase II Permit Program applies to municipalities with a population of 1,000-100,000 people. Facilities such as public universities, hospitals and military bases are required to follow the statewide Phase II Small MS4 program. The storm water from these entities are monitored at least 72 hours after rainfall. The Storm Water Management Program (SWMP) helps the campus to achieve the goal of sustainability and minimizing pollutants in our environment. This project evaluated the application of the wireless hand-held devices for the Storm Water Management Program (SWMP) at a California State University campus. Calibration curves for the wireless turbidity and conductivity sensors showed excellent linearity ( r2 > 0.99).Stormwater samples were collected from our campus and the conductivity, turbidity, and pH values were measured and compared with the actionable levels sets by the California Water Board. The results showed that the stormwater was below the actionable levels. (conductivity ≥2000 μS/cm, turbidity ≥1000 NTU, and ≤5 pH ≥9).

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Application of Wireless Hand-held Devices for Storm Water Management Program (SWMP)

215

Storm water is rainwater that falls onto the surfaces of roads, buildings, driveways, etc; it is then collected by a network of storm water drainage. When storm water travels to the drainage, it collects several types of oils, debris, bacteria and pollutants that are transferred to the oceans, lakes, and ponds. Storm water from CSUSM directly deposits into the ocean. The California Waterboards’ Municipal Storm Water Program issues permits based on population, the Phase II Permit Program applies to municipalities with a population of 1,000-100,000 people. Facilities such as public universities, hospitals and military bases are required to follow the statewide Phase II Small MS4 program. The storm water from these entities are monitored at least 72 hours after rainfall. The Storm Water Management Program (SWMP) helps the campus to achieve the goal of sustainability and minimizing pollutants in our environment. This project evaluated the application of the wireless hand-held devices for the Storm Water Management Program (SWMP) at a California State University campus. Calibration curves for the wireless turbidity and conductivity sensors showed excellent linearity ( r2 > 0.99).Stormwater samples were collected from our campus and the conductivity, turbidity, and pH values were measured and compared with the actionable levels sets by the California Water Board. The results showed that the stormwater was below the actionable levels. (conductivity ≥2000 μS/cm, turbidity ≥1000 NTU, and ≤5 pH ≥9).