Presentation Title

Education as a Cure: The Vicious Circle of Policy Engagement in Rural Communities in Rajasthan, India

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Lia Roberts

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

21

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

This research explores the relationship between the lack of access to education that affects women and, subsequently, their political engagement in rural Rajasthan, India. Studies argue that education in Rajasthan is seen as a cultural phenomenon that has historically excluded women and girls. In the 1991 Census, only about 34.4 per cent of primary aged girls in Rajasthan were in school. Although, Rajasthan has made improvements by providing more schools in rural ares, the region continues to be one the most difficult to ensure universal basic education. For the young girls and women living in rural communities, the transportation to formal schooling with experienced administration is difficult and usually inaccessible. This inadequate education system disables women and girls from forming political organizations and stymies political engagement in some political activities, but not in others. An analysis of interviews collected in rural communities in Rajahstan (MSMU GWSTEM Cohort 3) demonstrates varied political activity despite low education rates. Paired with historical analysis of education trends and political participation among rural women, this research helps explain variation in types of political participation.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Education as a Cure: The Vicious Circle of Policy Engagement in Rural Communities in Rajasthan, India

21

This research explores the relationship between the lack of access to education that affects women and, subsequently, their political engagement in rural Rajasthan, India. Studies argue that education in Rajasthan is seen as a cultural phenomenon that has historically excluded women and girls. In the 1991 Census, only about 34.4 per cent of primary aged girls in Rajasthan were in school. Although, Rajasthan has made improvements by providing more schools in rural ares, the region continues to be one the most difficult to ensure universal basic education. For the young girls and women living in rural communities, the transportation to formal schooling with experienced administration is difficult and usually inaccessible. This inadequate education system disables women and girls from forming political organizations and stymies political engagement in some political activities, but not in others. An analysis of interviews collected in rural communities in Rajahstan (MSMU GWSTEM Cohort 3) demonstrates varied political activity despite low education rates. Paired with historical analysis of education trends and political participation among rural women, this research helps explain variation in types of political participation.