Presentation Title

Analysis of Mus: A Card Game from the Basque Country

Faculty Mentor

Amber Puha, Rika Yoshii

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

231

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

In our research, we calculated the probabilities of obtaining opening hands in the Basque card-game Mus; for each possible hand combination of cards, we computed win rates in two of four mini rounds of two-player Mus, Handia (Big) and Txikia (Small); and we analyzed probabilities of events in Mus to form winning strategies. Furthermore, we simulated a simplified version of the game to aid as a learning tool and to test winning strategies for placing bets in Mus.

Our research is important for the preservation and transmission of the Basque culture and traditions. The Basque culture is an autonomous indigenous ethnic group located in the Basque country in Northcentral Spain and Southwestern France. A significant Basque immigration to the United States of America first occurred during the Gold Rush in 1848 and again occurred during Franco’s fascist dictatorship in the mid 1900’s. The culture has been preserved through Basque clubs as well as cultural related activities such as playing Mus. We are the first that we know of to attempt a probabilistic analysis of the game.

Future directions of this research include: computing the expected values of points earned by a given hand, generating probabilities of the other two mini rounds, Pareak (Pairs) and Jokoa (Game), and expanding to four-player and six-player Mus. Finally, additional implementation in a Mus simulation can be achieved by allowing the actions of going mus and robust opponent betting.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Analysis of Mus: A Card Game from the Basque Country

231

In our research, we calculated the probabilities of obtaining opening hands in the Basque card-game Mus; for each possible hand combination of cards, we computed win rates in two of four mini rounds of two-player Mus, Handia (Big) and Txikia (Small); and we analyzed probabilities of events in Mus to form winning strategies. Furthermore, we simulated a simplified version of the game to aid as a learning tool and to test winning strategies for placing bets in Mus.

Our research is important for the preservation and transmission of the Basque culture and traditions. The Basque culture is an autonomous indigenous ethnic group located in the Basque country in Northcentral Spain and Southwestern France. A significant Basque immigration to the United States of America first occurred during the Gold Rush in 1848 and again occurred during Franco’s fascist dictatorship in the mid 1900’s. The culture has been preserved through Basque clubs as well as cultural related activities such as playing Mus. We are the first that we know of to attempt a probabilistic analysis of the game.

Future directions of this research include: computing the expected values of points earned by a given hand, generating probabilities of the other two mini rounds, Pareak (Pairs) and Jokoa (Game), and expanding to four-player and six-player Mus. Finally, additional implementation in a Mus simulation can be achieved by allowing the actions of going mus and robust opponent betting.