Presentation Title

Evaluating the Role of Acculturative Stress During the Prenatal and Postnatal Period on Offspring’s Temperamental Development During the Preschool Age

Faculty Mentor

Kimberly D'Anna-Hernandez, PhD

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

23

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Cultural stressors present during the prenatal and postnatal periods can be associated with long-term developmental effects in offspring behavior. High maternal reports of acculturative stress during the early stages of pregnancy is important to analyze as the first trimester is the most critical to fetal development. Cultural stressors can also affect maternal mental health and postnatal mother infant interactions. Acculturation is a pervasive factor that involves the adoption of values and customs of a dominant culture. This change can become a stressful event as individuals can experience constant pressures and limitations to culturally assimilate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of maternal acculturative stress during the pre and post natal periods on temperament development of offspring during the preschool age. The population of interest is Mexican-American expecting mothers (n=57) and their offspring (n=57). This population is of high relevance to the study as the Mexican-American population is the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States and is vulnerable to high levels of cultural stressors. Expecting mothers filled out surveys assessing acculturative stress (SAFE) at 15 weeks gestation, 64 weeks postpartum and during the preschool age. Temperament was evaluated through a laboratory battery (LabTAB) taken when the child was between 2.5-5 years of age. Positive and negative affect of the child was assessed through observed levels of happiness, sadness, anger and fear expressed during standardized lab episodes.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Evaluating the Role of Acculturative Stress During the Prenatal and Postnatal Period on Offspring’s Temperamental Development During the Preschool Age

23

Cultural stressors present during the prenatal and postnatal periods can be associated with long-term developmental effects in offspring behavior. High maternal reports of acculturative stress during the early stages of pregnancy is important to analyze as the first trimester is the most critical to fetal development. Cultural stressors can also affect maternal mental health and postnatal mother infant interactions. Acculturation is a pervasive factor that involves the adoption of values and customs of a dominant culture. This change can become a stressful event as individuals can experience constant pressures and limitations to culturally assimilate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of maternal acculturative stress during the pre and post natal periods on temperament development of offspring during the preschool age. The population of interest is Mexican-American expecting mothers (n=57) and their offspring (n=57). This population is of high relevance to the study as the Mexican-American population is the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States and is vulnerable to high levels of cultural stressors. Expecting mothers filled out surveys assessing acculturative stress (SAFE) at 15 weeks gestation, 64 weeks postpartum and during the preschool age. Temperament was evaluated through a laboratory battery (LabTAB) taken when the child was between 2.5-5 years of age. Positive and negative affect of the child was assessed through observed levels of happiness, sadness, anger and fear expressed during standardized lab episodes.