Presentation Title

Determination of the growth curve for the fish pathogen Mycobacterium marinum grown in dark versus light conditions

Faculty Mentor

Jacqueline A. Trischman

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

249

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Our laboratory uses a uracil auxotroph of the fish pathogen Mycobacterium marinum as a surrogate for M. tuberculosis. In this study, we determined that this strain of M. marinum grows differently in the dark versus in ambient light conditions. Growth curves were established in these two conditions by wrapping one tube in foil and allowing both to incubate at 31oC while shaking at 220 rpm. The OD600, OD450 (used to track beta-carotene production), colony-forming units (CFU), and percentage of rough versus smooth colony morphology were determined over the course of 12 days of growth and 25 days of reading plates using uracil enriched 7H9 media. Results indicated that M. marinum grows more slowly and produces b-carotene at the slower rate when grown in the dark. The colony morphology, however, did not follow the same pattern, moving to a higher percent rough colonies in almost a linear manner. This project provides the basis for a larger growth study of this important bacterium.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Determination of the growth curve for the fish pathogen Mycobacterium marinum grown in dark versus light conditions

249

Our laboratory uses a uracil auxotroph of the fish pathogen Mycobacterium marinum as a surrogate for M. tuberculosis. In this study, we determined that this strain of M. marinum grows differently in the dark versus in ambient light conditions. Growth curves were established in these two conditions by wrapping one tube in foil and allowing both to incubate at 31oC while shaking at 220 rpm. The OD600, OD450 (used to track beta-carotene production), colony-forming units (CFU), and percentage of rough versus smooth colony morphology were determined over the course of 12 days of growth and 25 days of reading plates using uracil enriched 7H9 media. Results indicated that M. marinum grows more slowly and produces b-carotene at the slower rate when grown in the dark. The colony morphology, however, did not follow the same pattern, moving to a higher percent rough colonies in almost a linear manner. This project provides the basis for a larger growth study of this important bacterium.