Presentation Title

Familism and Attitude toward Education among Mexican American College Students

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Noriko Toyokawa

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

29

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Background: Racial-ethnic socialization theory hypothesizes that ethnic minority students who achieve their academic goals are more likely to be socialized to strengthen their concrete attitudes for education embedded in their traditional cultural values (Atkin & Yoo, 2019). Nevertheless, limited research has been conducted on the roles of familism and attitudes toward education among Mexican American college students. Objective: The current study examines the role of familism for Mexican American college students’ concrete attitudes toward education. Method: Participants included Mexican American college students (N =278, Mage= 20.80, SD = 2.80) recruited through an online survey. Familism was assessed by the mean of the score answered by a 5-Likert type scale of family obligation, family as referents, and familial support respectively from the Mexican American Cultural Values Scale (Knight et al., 2010).Concrete attitudes toward education was assessed by the mean of the score of 6-items answered by 7-point Likert type scale of Attitudes toward Education (Michelson, 1990). Results: Regression analyses revealed Age, first generation student, work experience, family obligation, and family as a referents were associated with greater endorsement of general attitudes toward education .Discussion: Consistent with racial-ethnic socialization theory, Mexican American college students’ socialization in their family was positively associated with endorsement of concrete attitudes toward education. Our results suggest first generation students and those who have greater endorsement of family obligation may have learned these expectations given the social structure from their family members. Implications for Mexican American college students’ support for college personal will be discussed.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Familism and Attitude toward Education among Mexican American College Students

29

Background: Racial-ethnic socialization theory hypothesizes that ethnic minority students who achieve their academic goals are more likely to be socialized to strengthen their concrete attitudes for education embedded in their traditional cultural values (Atkin & Yoo, 2019). Nevertheless, limited research has been conducted on the roles of familism and attitudes toward education among Mexican American college students. Objective: The current study examines the role of familism for Mexican American college students’ concrete attitudes toward education. Method: Participants included Mexican American college students (N =278, Mage= 20.80, SD = 2.80) recruited through an online survey. Familism was assessed by the mean of the score answered by a 5-Likert type scale of family obligation, family as referents, and familial support respectively from the Mexican American Cultural Values Scale (Knight et al., 2010).Concrete attitudes toward education was assessed by the mean of the score of 6-items answered by 7-point Likert type scale of Attitudes toward Education (Michelson, 1990). Results: Regression analyses revealed Age, first generation student, work experience, family obligation, and family as a referents were associated with greater endorsement of general attitudes toward education .Discussion: Consistent with racial-ethnic socialization theory, Mexican American college students’ socialization in their family was positively associated with endorsement of concrete attitudes toward education. Our results suggest first generation students and those who have greater endorsement of family obligation may have learned these expectations given the social structure from their family members. Implications for Mexican American college students’ support for college personal will be discussed.