Presentation Title

Utilizing DNA Barcoding to Create Wildlife Corridors

Faculty Mentor

Henry Cen, Jim Gilardi

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

33

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

As DNA barcoding emerges as a means to measure species biodiversity, the authors of this project aim to utilize DNA barcoding to establish a multi-elevational wildlife corridor that promotes community richness, species migration, and an expanded gene pool on and around the Mount Pinos Ranger District (MPRD) of the Los Padres National Forest. The MPRD is a unique display of the plant community Pinyon-Juniper Woodland, which includes Great Basin sagebrush, rabbitbrush, blackbrush, scrub oak, valley cholla, and many rare plant species (fs.usda.gov). Further, the area is strategic habitat for migrating insects, including the Monarch butterfly, is adjacent to the rich agricultural land of the San Joaquin Valley, and is in the flight path of California condors released at nearby Bittercreek National Wildlife Refuge.

The foundation for the wildlife corridor as protection of an evolutionarily rich habitat begins with the demonstration of biodiversity in insect communities.

This multi-phase projects starts with an experiment and hypothesis that there will be statistical diversity in both richness and abundance among the insects visiting bowl traps reflecting the colors purple, yellow, and hologram white. Over 500 insects were collected in twelve different-colored bowl traps. Insects were each classified by Order and some were selected for DNA analysis.

In the process of this experiment, a new species of Asilidae was collected in a bowl trap, barcoded, and then submitted to the BOLD Systems database. This new species showed only 90% DNA similarity to its closest DNA relative, Stenopogon albibasis (ncbi.nlm.nih.gov).

Because of this relatively large disparity in DNA similarity, the authors are continuing the DNA analysis of frozen specimens collected during the sample period, attempting to fill in gaps in the Tree of Life with new barcoded species, as DNA barcoding may facilitate delineation of species and overcome some limitations of morphological analysis.

http://fs.usda.gov/detail/lpnf/learning/nature-science/?cid=fsm9_034063

https://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Blast.cgi

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Utilizing DNA Barcoding to Create Wildlife Corridors

33

As DNA barcoding emerges as a means to measure species biodiversity, the authors of this project aim to utilize DNA barcoding to establish a multi-elevational wildlife corridor that promotes community richness, species migration, and an expanded gene pool on and around the Mount Pinos Ranger District (MPRD) of the Los Padres National Forest. The MPRD is a unique display of the plant community Pinyon-Juniper Woodland, which includes Great Basin sagebrush, rabbitbrush, blackbrush, scrub oak, valley cholla, and many rare plant species (fs.usda.gov). Further, the area is strategic habitat for migrating insects, including the Monarch butterfly, is adjacent to the rich agricultural land of the San Joaquin Valley, and is in the flight path of California condors released at nearby Bittercreek National Wildlife Refuge.

The foundation for the wildlife corridor as protection of an evolutionarily rich habitat begins with the demonstration of biodiversity in insect communities.

This multi-phase projects starts with an experiment and hypothesis that there will be statistical diversity in both richness and abundance among the insects visiting bowl traps reflecting the colors purple, yellow, and hologram white. Over 500 insects were collected in twelve different-colored bowl traps. Insects were each classified by Order and some were selected for DNA analysis.

In the process of this experiment, a new species of Asilidae was collected in a bowl trap, barcoded, and then submitted to the BOLD Systems database. This new species showed only 90% DNA similarity to its closest DNA relative, Stenopogon albibasis (ncbi.nlm.nih.gov).

Because of this relatively large disparity in DNA similarity, the authors are continuing the DNA analysis of frozen specimens collected during the sample period, attempting to fill in gaps in the Tree of Life with new barcoded species, as DNA barcoding may facilitate delineation of species and overcome some limitations of morphological analysis.

http://fs.usda.gov/detail/lpnf/learning/nature-science/?cid=fsm9_034063

https://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Blast.cgi