Presentation Title

Social Influences on Women Entrepreneurship

Presenter Information

Tsz Ki ShingFollow

Faculty Mentor

Karla Hernandez, Department of Sociology, Mount San Antonio College

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

37

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Equal educational opportunities has opened up employment options and social mobility for females in recent decades. Despite women’s improvement, the highest position in companies are still dominated by men. According to the U.S. Department of Labor (2019), only 36 percent of all businesses are women owned. To investigate why there are fewer female entrepreneurs, I conducted a literature review, examining the different factors that limit women’s entrepreneurial opportunities. This paper will argue that the restrictions women entrepreneurs encounter are based on social factors over personal abilities. One study suggests that confidence plays a huge role in entrepreneurship success. Specifically, women are easily discouraged when they encounter social and economical barriers compared to men (Mollick 2015). In the face of financial deficits, females are more likely to lose faith in themselves. Another study constructed by Fletcher (2018) indicates that imposter syndrome is the most common trait women entrepreneurs experience. Women tend to give up opportunities because they always assume someone else is better. Women’s mindsets have limited their potential growth. Beyond psychological effects, Russett (2005) proposes that social constraints affect women’s career development. Many women at elite college set their career path aside to motherhood because they believe women should be responsible for childcare and committed to family. Society's expectations of motherhood becomes a block for intelligent females to achieve higher social status. Results suggest that mental implications and gender roles hinder women’s success in business. Further research can focus on ways to increase women’s confidence and self efficacy in order to break the glass ceiling. Social stereotypes of females should be transformed.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Social Influences on Women Entrepreneurship

37

Equal educational opportunities has opened up employment options and social mobility for females in recent decades. Despite women’s improvement, the highest position in companies are still dominated by men. According to the U.S. Department of Labor (2019), only 36 percent of all businesses are women owned. To investigate why there are fewer female entrepreneurs, I conducted a literature review, examining the different factors that limit women’s entrepreneurial opportunities. This paper will argue that the restrictions women entrepreneurs encounter are based on social factors over personal abilities. One study suggests that confidence plays a huge role in entrepreneurship success. Specifically, women are easily discouraged when they encounter social and economical barriers compared to men (Mollick 2015). In the face of financial deficits, females are more likely to lose faith in themselves. Another study constructed by Fletcher (2018) indicates that imposter syndrome is the most common trait women entrepreneurs experience. Women tend to give up opportunities because they always assume someone else is better. Women’s mindsets have limited their potential growth. Beyond psychological effects, Russett (2005) proposes that social constraints affect women’s career development. Many women at elite college set their career path aside to motherhood because they believe women should be responsible for childcare and committed to family. Society's expectations of motherhood becomes a block for intelligent females to achieve higher social status. Results suggest that mental implications and gender roles hinder women’s success in business. Further research can focus on ways to increase women’s confidence and self efficacy in order to break the glass ceiling. Social stereotypes of females should be transformed.