Presentation Title

Discovering the Link Between Childhood Disrespect, Self-Deprecating World Views, and Tolerance of Partner Maltreatment

Faculty Mentor

Valeska Dubon

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

39

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

  • As of 2019, many women experience overwhelmingly high rates of mental, verbal, emotional, and psychological abuse. The high rates of domestic violence against women has been a pervasive problem and concern in the fields of both psychology and social work. The prevalence towards tolerating abusive behaviors from partners was measured in females through a college survey. A correlation was found between three variables that were measured: childhood maltreatment, partner maltreatment, and self-deprecating world views. Various scales were used to measure the variables in depth such as the contingencies of self-worth scale and the Abusive Behavior Inventory. New questions were also created by the researcher in an effort to reduce the gap between the dissonance of what women are actually feeling, and common survey questions that may not always accurately capture the nuances of their experiences. A question such as “I feel afraid that no one else would love me if I left the relationship.” was used. The results supported all three hypotheses by showing a correlation between each variable. Females who scored higher on childhood disrespect (maltreatment) also reported higher scores in self-deprecating worldviews. (r=0.45, df=52, p<.001). In addition to the variables themselves, many questions were independently analyzed and a strong correlation between them was also detected. These findings shed light on common feelings, thought patterns, and behaviors that women internalize in their childhood that play a role in their abusive relationships later in life. The study also demonstrated the importance of capturing all levels of the elements that play into a woman finding herself with an abusive partner and why sometimes she is not fully able to articulate her experiences in words. This is crucial in understanding and proposing future intervention for women that would take into consideration their cognitions, feelings, internal acknowledgement, perception, and lack of awareness

Keywords: female abuse, disrespect, self-esteem, re-victimization, women

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Discovering the Link Between Childhood Disrespect, Self-Deprecating World Views, and Tolerance of Partner Maltreatment

39

  • As of 2019, many women experience overwhelmingly high rates of mental, verbal, emotional, and psychological abuse. The high rates of domestic violence against women has been a pervasive problem and concern in the fields of both psychology and social work. The prevalence towards tolerating abusive behaviors from partners was measured in females through a college survey. A correlation was found between three variables that were measured: childhood maltreatment, partner maltreatment, and self-deprecating world views. Various scales were used to measure the variables in depth such as the contingencies of self-worth scale and the Abusive Behavior Inventory. New questions were also created by the researcher in an effort to reduce the gap between the dissonance of what women are actually feeling, and common survey questions that may not always accurately capture the nuances of their experiences. A question such as “I feel afraid that no one else would love me if I left the relationship.” was used. The results supported all three hypotheses by showing a correlation between each variable. Females who scored higher on childhood disrespect (maltreatment) also reported higher scores in self-deprecating worldviews. (r=0.45, df=52, p<.001). In addition to the variables themselves, many questions were independently analyzed and a strong correlation between them was also detected. These findings shed light on common feelings, thought patterns, and behaviors that women internalize in their childhood that play a role in their abusive relationships later in life. The study also demonstrated the importance of capturing all levels of the elements that play into a woman finding herself with an abusive partner and why sometimes she is not fully able to articulate her experiences in words. This is crucial in understanding and proposing future intervention for women that would take into consideration their cognitions, feelings, internal acknowledgement, perception, and lack of awareness

Keywords: female abuse, disrespect, self-esteem, re-victimization, women