Presentation Title

From ABC to AGB: Estimating the Trajectory of the San Bernardino National Forest

Presenter Information

Gabriel AltieriFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Hillary Jenkins

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

63

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The frequency and intensity of wildfires are increasing across California under a changing climate. Disturbance of forested ecosystems following wildfire holds major influence on biodiversity, nutrient cycling and carbon storage. Previous studies (Lloret & Zedler, 2014) have suggested a Fire Regime Resiliency Model where forested ecosystems are capable of recovery from frequent low-intensity burn events. Here we examine the resilience of the mixed pine coniferous forest ecosystem following the Lake Fire, which burned approximately 12,000 hectares (31,000 acres) of San Bernardino National Forest in 2015. A total of 8 field plots (18 m x 18 m) were established where Stem Density, DBH, Tree Height, Tree Status, Sapling Data, Fractional Canopy Cover, & Fractional Ground Cover were measured at each site location. Significant differences between control and fire sites were found in the composition of the understory, the fraction of canopy cover, the number of living trees, the thickness of the litter fraction, soil moisture, and the number of saplings. Forest sapling regrowth is diminished in fire plots compared with control plots, suggesting the presence of shrubs and grasses may inhibit the recovery of pine saplings. Allometric equations of Above Ground Biomass were used to calculate the total above ground biomass (kg) and the change (loss) in biomass at each site location. The average amount of biomass measured in this study (461.79 mg/ha) is significantly higher than remote sensing estimates (106-366 mg/ha), highlighting the importance of field observations.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

From ABC to AGB: Estimating the Trajectory of the San Bernardino National Forest

63

The frequency and intensity of wildfires are increasing across California under a changing climate. Disturbance of forested ecosystems following wildfire holds major influence on biodiversity, nutrient cycling and carbon storage. Previous studies (Lloret & Zedler, 2014) have suggested a Fire Regime Resiliency Model where forested ecosystems are capable of recovery from frequent low-intensity burn events. Here we examine the resilience of the mixed pine coniferous forest ecosystem following the Lake Fire, which burned approximately 12,000 hectares (31,000 acres) of San Bernardino National Forest in 2015. A total of 8 field plots (18 m x 18 m) were established where Stem Density, DBH, Tree Height, Tree Status, Sapling Data, Fractional Canopy Cover, & Fractional Ground Cover were measured at each site location. Significant differences between control and fire sites were found in the composition of the understory, the fraction of canopy cover, the number of living trees, the thickness of the litter fraction, soil moisture, and the number of saplings. Forest sapling regrowth is diminished in fire plots compared with control plots, suggesting the presence of shrubs and grasses may inhibit the recovery of pine saplings. Allometric equations of Above Ground Biomass were used to calculate the total above ground biomass (kg) and the change (loss) in biomass at each site location. The average amount of biomass measured in this study (461.79 mg/ha) is significantly higher than remote sensing estimates (106-366 mg/ha), highlighting the importance of field observations.