Presentation Title

Meta-data Analysis of Comparing Flight Initiation Distance Between Rural and Urban Populations of Animals Across 31 Species

Faculty Mentor

Peter Nonacs

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

79

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The increase in human population size and urbanization has placed pressure on many animal species to modify their natural behavior. An animal’s anti-predator responses are one important suite of behaviors that may be influenced by the presence of humans. One ubiquitous antipredatory response across many species is fleeing. Flight initiation distance (FID) is a commonly used measurement to quantify the anti-predatory response rate of animals in the field of behavioral ecology. FID is measured by an experimenter walking toward an animal at a constant rate and stopping when the individual flees. FID is the distance from the research when the animal fled and the original distance of the individual. Over the past decade, there has been an increase in papers published comparing the FIDs of populations of a great number of animal species in rural versus urban environments. Here, I present a meta-data analysis to test the hypothesis that across species populations of animals living in higher human-populated areas will have lower FID scores than those residing in rural areas, meaning individuals living in more populated areas will allow a potential predator (i.e. human) to come in closer contact than individuals in more rural areas. I reviewed 31 papers each which compared the FIDs of a distinct species living in rural and urban areas. For each paper I recorded the population group (i.e. urban versus rural) and whether their respective FIDs were higher or lower. Results of this work demonstrate that populations of animals across the 31 species reviewed living in urban areas had lower FIDs than those living in rural areas [F(1,60)=47.49, p-value=0.523e-9]. This may indicate that regardless of species, animals in highly human-populated areas will tolerate threats at closer distances before fleeing than those in rural areas.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Meta-data Analysis of Comparing Flight Initiation Distance Between Rural and Urban Populations of Animals Across 31 Species

79

The increase in human population size and urbanization has placed pressure on many animal species to modify their natural behavior. An animal’s anti-predator responses are one important suite of behaviors that may be influenced by the presence of humans. One ubiquitous antipredatory response across many species is fleeing. Flight initiation distance (FID) is a commonly used measurement to quantify the anti-predatory response rate of animals in the field of behavioral ecology. FID is measured by an experimenter walking toward an animal at a constant rate and stopping when the individual flees. FID is the distance from the research when the animal fled and the original distance of the individual. Over the past decade, there has been an increase in papers published comparing the FIDs of populations of a great number of animal species in rural versus urban environments. Here, I present a meta-data analysis to test the hypothesis that across species populations of animals living in higher human-populated areas will have lower FID scores than those residing in rural areas, meaning individuals living in more populated areas will allow a potential predator (i.e. human) to come in closer contact than individuals in more rural areas. I reviewed 31 papers each which compared the FIDs of a distinct species living in rural and urban areas. For each paper I recorded the population group (i.e. urban versus rural) and whether their respective FIDs were higher or lower. Results of this work demonstrate that populations of animals across the 31 species reviewed living in urban areas had lower FIDs than those living in rural areas [F(1,60)=47.49, p-value=0.523e-9]. This may indicate that regardless of species, animals in highly human-populated areas will tolerate threats at closer distances before fleeing than those in rural areas.