Presentation Title

Guiding Students Through Undergraduate to Graduate Matriculation: Best Practices for Summer Program Interventions

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Dawn Person

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

139

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

education

Abstract

Within the north Orange County region of California; Latino/a’s, Pacific Islanders, and Southeast Asians are underrepresented in higher education and in Health professions. The North Orange County Allied and Other Health Careers Opportunity Program (NOCA HCOP) is a pipeline program that provides underrepresented students with access to resources to help them matriculate and graduate from their present educational level and achieve a degree in a health profession. The Pre-Matriculation Program (PMP), a summer program within NOCA HCOP, prepares incoming graduate students for graduate education. If students participate in academic interventions, such as workshops and research activities, then there will be an increase in motivation and research skills in allied health. The current study measures the effectiveness of the 2019 PMP using quantitative and qualitative methods. Students, n = 17, completed pre- and post-surveys, via an online survey software (Qualtrics); and participated in focus groups following the completion of the program. The majority of participants identified as Hispanic (64.7%, n = 11), followed by Asian (23.5%, n = 4), and Black or African-American (11.8%, n = 2). Survey data consisted of Likert-type items from a scale of 1 (Strongly Disagree) to 4 (Strongly Agree), and on a scale from 1 (Not at all likely) to 4 (Very Likely). The focus groups were approximately an hour and contained 10 protocol questions related to students’ experience in the program. Researchers examined student knowledge of allied health careers, awareness of resources, confidence in research skills, and readiness for graduate school. A paired samples t-test was conducted and results illustrated a significant increase in knowledge and preparedness for graduate school. The focus groups revealed that students felt motivated and supported by their peers, and also gained research experience necessary for graduate school. Findings demonstrate that the PMP was effective and the program’s goals were met.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Guiding Students Through Undergraduate to Graduate Matriculation: Best Practices for Summer Program Interventions

139

Within the north Orange County region of California; Latino/a’s, Pacific Islanders, and Southeast Asians are underrepresented in higher education and in Health professions. The North Orange County Allied and Other Health Careers Opportunity Program (NOCA HCOP) is a pipeline program that provides underrepresented students with access to resources to help them matriculate and graduate from their present educational level and achieve a degree in a health profession. The Pre-Matriculation Program (PMP), a summer program within NOCA HCOP, prepares incoming graduate students for graduate education. If students participate in academic interventions, such as workshops and research activities, then there will be an increase in motivation and research skills in allied health. The current study measures the effectiveness of the 2019 PMP using quantitative and qualitative methods. Students, n = 17, completed pre- and post-surveys, via an online survey software (Qualtrics); and participated in focus groups following the completion of the program. The majority of participants identified as Hispanic (64.7%, n = 11), followed by Asian (23.5%, n = 4), and Black or African-American (11.8%, n = 2). Survey data consisted of Likert-type items from a scale of 1 (Strongly Disagree) to 4 (Strongly Agree), and on a scale from 1 (Not at all likely) to 4 (Very Likely). The focus groups were approximately an hour and contained 10 protocol questions related to students’ experience in the program. Researchers examined student knowledge of allied health careers, awareness of resources, confidence in research skills, and readiness for graduate school. A paired samples t-test was conducted and results illustrated a significant increase in knowledge and preparedness for graduate school. The focus groups revealed that students felt motivated and supported by their peers, and also gained research experience necessary for graduate school. Findings demonstrate that the PMP was effective and the program’s goals were met.