Presentation Title

Double Network Hydrogels for Repair and Sealing of Corneal Injuries

Faculty Mentor

Nasim Annabi

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

161

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Corneal trauma can be in different forms such as partial- or full-thickness corneal lacerations, corneal epithelial and stromal defects. Current standards of care for major corneal lacerations have significant drawbacks. Generally, treatment options include use of suturing, or other types of bioadhesives. However, sutures can result in regular and irregular astigmatism, neovascularization, or infection. To allow for sutureless repair of corneal lacerations, a biocompatible and strong and adhesive sealant is required on the cornea long enough for complete wound healing. This project aims to combine the best properties of synthetic and natural polymers to obtain an adhesive sealant with enhanced mechanical properties for corneal wound closure. We developed a bioadhesvie hybrid hydrogel by using a naturally-derived polymer with great adhesive properties and a synthetic triblock copolyelectrolytes to enhance its mechanical properties. Gelatin methacryloy (GelMA), a gelatin-based hydrogel that resembles some essential properties of native Extracellular Matrix (ECM), was chosen for the project. We plan to combine GelMA with low concentrations of triblock copolyelectrolytes to form a double network hydrogel. Triblock co-polyelectrolytes drive micellization due to the charges on its terminal ends, creating a strong double network with GelMA. We hypothesized that the double network hydrogel has better mechanical properties than regular GelMA, and can be utilized in sealing corneal tissues. Our aim is to find the optimal concentration of GelMA combined with triblock copolyelectrolytes, and also the optimal time of crosslinking to enhance mechanical properties. In order to test out their mechanical properties, the double network hydrogel will then be tested for their compressive modulus and Young’s modulus. Preliminary results have shown that certain concentrations of polyelectrolyte cross-linked with GelMA enhances the compressive and tensile properties of GelMA. Further mechanical testing will be performed on the complex. The end goal is to apply the polyelectrolyte-GelMA complex for ocular wound sealing.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Double Network Hydrogels for Repair and Sealing of Corneal Injuries

161

Corneal trauma can be in different forms such as partial- or full-thickness corneal lacerations, corneal epithelial and stromal defects. Current standards of care for major corneal lacerations have significant drawbacks. Generally, treatment options include use of suturing, or other types of bioadhesives. However, sutures can result in regular and irregular astigmatism, neovascularization, or infection. To allow for sutureless repair of corneal lacerations, a biocompatible and strong and adhesive sealant is required on the cornea long enough for complete wound healing. This project aims to combine the best properties of synthetic and natural polymers to obtain an adhesive sealant with enhanced mechanical properties for corneal wound closure. We developed a bioadhesvie hybrid hydrogel by using a naturally-derived polymer with great adhesive properties and a synthetic triblock copolyelectrolytes to enhance its mechanical properties. Gelatin methacryloy (GelMA), a gelatin-based hydrogel that resembles some essential properties of native Extracellular Matrix (ECM), was chosen for the project. We plan to combine GelMA with low concentrations of triblock copolyelectrolytes to form a double network hydrogel. Triblock co-polyelectrolytes drive micellization due to the charges on its terminal ends, creating a strong double network with GelMA. We hypothesized that the double network hydrogel has better mechanical properties than regular GelMA, and can be utilized in sealing corneal tissues. Our aim is to find the optimal concentration of GelMA combined with triblock copolyelectrolytes, and also the optimal time of crosslinking to enhance mechanical properties. In order to test out their mechanical properties, the double network hydrogel will then be tested for their compressive modulus and Young’s modulus. Preliminary results have shown that certain concentrations of polyelectrolyte cross-linked with GelMA enhances the compressive and tensile properties of GelMA. Further mechanical testing will be performed on the complex. The end goal is to apply the polyelectrolyte-GelMA complex for ocular wound sealing.