Presentation Title

Optimizing the Carbonization of Agricultural Waste to Micro- and Mesoporous Carbon Materials

Faculty Mentor

Kandis Leslie Abdul-Aziz

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

165

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Biomass is the fourth most abundant renewable source of energy and an excellent candidate for sustainable resources and fuels. Our lab aims to develop strategies to use biomass, specifically agricultural waste, as marketable and environmentally friendly products. Due to its abundance as agricultural waste and its accessibility, corn stover is an ideal starting candidate for its conversion into biochar that functions as either an adsorbent or catalyst support. The corn stover has been milled down to 1 mm and thermochemically converted using hydrothermal carbonization into hydrochar. Hydrothermal carbonization is attractive because the biochar heats up in water at an overall lower temperature and yields more solid structures than faster pyrolysis methods that yield more gases and liquids at much higher temperatures. The experimental conditions during hydrothermal carbonization were varied to determine the effect of temperature, water volume, and biomass loading to the properties of the final hydrochar product. By varying the temperature and dwell time the biochar results in different porosity and pore structure characteristics. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) tests were conducted on the various biochar samples to determine overall surface area, porosity, average pore size, and pore structure. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was used to visualize the pores that have formed on the surface. BET results have suggested that higher temperatures and longer dwell time increase the surface area. Through SEM visualization, the surface is changing significantly and becoming more visibly porous suggesting that porosity is increasing with temperature and duration as well. Additionally, one can observe a darkening and more powder-like appearance of the biochar. The importance of knowing that higher temperatures and longer duration increase surface area and porosity allows us to optimize the conditions for future applications.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Optimizing the Carbonization of Agricultural Waste to Micro- and Mesoporous Carbon Materials

165

Biomass is the fourth most abundant renewable source of energy and an excellent candidate for sustainable resources and fuels. Our lab aims to develop strategies to use biomass, specifically agricultural waste, as marketable and environmentally friendly products. Due to its abundance as agricultural waste and its accessibility, corn stover is an ideal starting candidate for its conversion into biochar that functions as either an adsorbent or catalyst support. The corn stover has been milled down to 1 mm and thermochemically converted using hydrothermal carbonization into hydrochar. Hydrothermal carbonization is attractive because the biochar heats up in water at an overall lower temperature and yields more solid structures than faster pyrolysis methods that yield more gases and liquids at much higher temperatures. The experimental conditions during hydrothermal carbonization were varied to determine the effect of temperature, water volume, and biomass loading to the properties of the final hydrochar product. By varying the temperature and dwell time the biochar results in different porosity and pore structure characteristics. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) tests were conducted on the various biochar samples to determine overall surface area, porosity, average pore size, and pore structure. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was used to visualize the pores that have formed on the surface. BET results have suggested that higher temperatures and longer dwell time increase the surface area. Through SEM visualization, the surface is changing significantly and becoming more visibly porous suggesting that porosity is increasing with temperature and duration as well. Additionally, one can observe a darkening and more powder-like appearance of the biochar. The importance of knowing that higher temperatures and longer duration increase surface area and porosity allows us to optimize the conditions for future applications.